Next Article in Journal
Strain-Specific Adaptations of Streptococcus mitis-oralis to Serial In Vitro Passage in Daptomycin (DAP): Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics
Next Article in Special Issue
Bacteriophage-Induced Lipopolysaccharide Mutations in Escherichia coli Lead to Hypersensitivity to Food Grade Surfactant Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Previous Article in Journal
Chemical Profiling and Discrimination of Essential Oils from Six Ferula Species Using GC Analyses Coupled with Chemometrics and Evaluation of Their Antioxidant and Enzyme Inhibitory Potential
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Hundred Years of Bacteriophages: Can Phages Replace Antibiotics in Agriculture and Aquaculture?
Article

Enzybiotics LYSSTAPH-S and LYSDERM-S as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Chronic MRSA Wound Infections

1
Clinical Immunology and Immunology of Infectious Diseases, Veterinary Research Institute, Brno, Hudcova 70, 62100 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Department of Microbiology, St. Anne’s University Hospital Brno and Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Pekařská 53, 65691 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Veveří 97, 60200 Brno, Czech Republic
4
Department of Experimental Biology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 62500 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(8), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080519
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 10 August 2020 / Accepted: 12 August 2020 / Published: 15 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phage Therapy, Lysin Therapy, and Antibiotics, a Trio Due to Come)
Antibacterial antibiotic therapy has played an important role in the treatment of bacterial infections for almost a century. The increasing resistance of pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics leads to an attempt to use previously neglected antibacterial therapies. Here we provide information on the two recombinantly modified antistaphylococcal enzymes derived from lysostaphin (LYSSTAPH-S) and endolysin (LYSDERM-S) derived from kayvirus 812F1 whose target sites reside in the bacterial cell wall. LYSSTAPH-S showed a stable antimicrobial effect over 24-h testing, even in concentrations lower than 1 µg/mL across a wide variety of epidemiologically important sequence types (STs) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), especially in the stationary phase of growth (status comparable to chronic infections). LYSDERM-S showed a less potent antimicrobial effect that lasted only a few hours at concentrations of 15 μg/mL and higher. Our data indicate that these antimicrobial enzymes could be of substantial help in the treatment of chronic MRSA wound infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: enzyme therapy; enzybiotics; lysostaphin; LYSSTAPH-S; endolysin; LYSDERM-S; MRSA enzyme therapy; enzybiotics; lysostaphin; LYSSTAPH-S; endolysin; LYSDERM-S; MRSA
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vacek, L.; Kobzová, Š.; Čmelík, R.; Pantůček, R.; Janda, L. Enzybiotics LYSSTAPH-S and LYSDERM-S as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Chronic MRSA Wound Infections. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 519. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080519

AMA Style

Vacek L, Kobzová Š, Čmelík R, Pantůček R, Janda L. Enzybiotics LYSSTAPH-S and LYSDERM-S as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Chronic MRSA Wound Infections. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(8):519. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080519

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vacek, Lukáš, Šárka Kobzová, Richard Čmelík, Roman Pantůček, and Lubomír Janda. 2020. "Enzybiotics LYSSTAPH-S and LYSDERM-S as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Chronic MRSA Wound Infections" Antibiotics 9, no. 8: 519. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080519

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop