Next Article in Journal
Phages for Biofilm Removal
Previous Article in Journal
In Vitro Activity of a Novel Siderophore-Cephalosporin, GT-1 and Serine-Type β-Lactamase Inhibitor, GT-055, against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter spp. Panel Strains
Previous Article in Special Issue
Thioporidiols A and B: Two New Sulfur Compounds Discovered by Molybdenum-Catalyzed Oxidation Screening from Trichoderma polypori FKI-7382
Open AccessArticle

Examining Safety of Biocolourants from Fungal and Plant Sources-Examples from Cortinarius and Tapinella, Salix and Tanacetum spp. and Dyed Woollen Fabrics

1
Craft Studies, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 8, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
2
Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
3
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
4
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1000, 02044 Espoo, Finland
5
Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Tietotie 4, 31600 Jokioinen, Finland
6
Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (IRPA/KIK), Parc du Cinquantenaire 1, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(5), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9050266
Received: 31 March 2020 / Revised: 13 May 2020 / Accepted: 18 May 2020 / Published: 20 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Secondary Metabolites)
Biocolourants have been investigated as alternatives to synthetic dyes. However, natural origin per se is not a label of harmlessness and research is needed to obtain safe dyes. We studied the cytotoxicity of the extracts from fungal (Cortinarius semisanguineus, Tapinella atrotomentosa) and plant (Tanacetum vulgare, Salix phylicifolia) sources and the woollen fabrics dyed with the extracts. Cytotoxicity in vitro using hepa-1 mouse hepatoma cells for 24 h and 72 h exposure was observed as the highest tolerated dose. All biocolourants produced intensive colour on fabrics with fastness properties from moderate to good. The Salix and Cortinarius samples did not show any cytotoxic effects, whereas the Tanacetum and Tapinella samples had slightly higher test values but were not interpreted as being significantly toxic. Higher than zero values of the undyed fabrics showed the importance of examining their toxicity as well. It was found that the cytotoxicity of the samples dyed with the biocolourants did not differ significantly from the undyed wool fabric. The concentrations of dyes used in the assays were very low, imitating the dose of the user. In addition to colouring properties, natural dyes may have pharmaceutical and antibacterial properties which would enhance the interest in using them in products for added value. View Full-Text
Keywords: natural dye; biocolourant; secondary metabolite; in vitro; cytotoxicity; mouse hepatoma cell; highest tolerated dose; HPLC-UV/Vis-MS natural dye; biocolourant; secondary metabolite; in vitro; cytotoxicity; mouse hepatoma cell; highest tolerated dose; HPLC-UV/Vis-MS
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Räisänen, R.; Primetta, A.; Nikunen, S.; Honkalampi, U.; Nygren, H.; Pihlava, J.-M.; Vanden Berghe, I.; von Wright, A. Examining Safety of Biocolourants from Fungal and Plant Sources-Examples from Cortinarius and Tapinella, Salix and Tanacetum spp. and Dyed Woollen Fabrics. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 266.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop