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Open AccessArticle

Mapping the Implementation of a Clinical Pharmacist-Driven Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme at a Tertiary Care Centre in South India

1
Department of Infection Control and Epidemiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi 682041, Kerala, India
2
Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi 682041, Kerala, India
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi 682041, Kerala, India
4
Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance, Imperial College, London W12 0NN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2021, 10(2), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10020220
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 1 January 2021 / Accepted: 5 January 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
In many parts of the world, including in India, pharmacist roles in antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes remain unexplored. We describe the evolution and effect of the role of adding clinical pharmacists to a multidisciplinary AMS at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Kerala, India. Through effective leadership, multidisciplinary AMS (February 2016) and antitubercular therapy (ATT) stewardship programmes (June 2017) were established. Clinical pharmacists were introduced as core members of the programmes, responsible for the operational delivery of key stewardship interventions. Pharmacy-led audit and feedback monitored the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescriptions and compliance to AMS/ATT recommendations. Between February 2016 and January 2017, 56% (742/1326) of antimicrobial prescriptions were appropriate, and 54% (318/584) of recommendations showed compliance. By the third year of the AMS, appropriateness increased to 80% (1752/2190), and compliance to the AMS recommendations to 70% (227/325). The appropriateness of ATT prescriptions increased from a baseline of 61% (95/157) in the first year, to 72% (62/86, June 2018–February 2019). The compliance to ATT recommendations increased from 42% (25/60) to 58% (14/24). Such a model can be effective in implementing sustainable change in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) such as India, where the shortage of infectious disease physicians is a major impediment to the implementation and sustainability of AMS programmes. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial stewardship; clinical pharmacist; antimicrobial resistance; antimicrobial management; defined daily dose antimicrobial stewardship; clinical pharmacist; antimicrobial resistance; antimicrobial management; defined daily dose
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nampoothiri, V.; Sudhir, A.S.; Joseph, M.V.; Mohamed, Z.; Menon, V.; Charani, E.; Singh, S. Mapping the Implementation of a Clinical Pharmacist-Driven Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme at a Tertiary Care Centre in South India. Antibiotics 2021, 10, 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10020220

AMA Style

Nampoothiri V, Sudhir AS, Joseph MV, Mohamed Z, Menon V, Charani E, Singh S. Mapping the Implementation of a Clinical Pharmacist-Driven Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme at a Tertiary Care Centre in South India. Antibiotics. 2021; 10(2):220. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10020220

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nampoothiri, Vrinda; Sudhir, Akkulath S.; Joseph, Mariam V.; Mohamed, Zubair; Menon, Vidya; Charani, Esmita; Singh, Sanjeev. 2021. "Mapping the Implementation of a Clinical Pharmacist-Driven Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme at a Tertiary Care Centre in South India" Antibiotics 10, no. 2: 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10020220

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