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Studies on the Exposure of Gadolinium Containing Nanoparticles with Monochromatic X-rays Drive Advances in Radiation Therapy

1
Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
2
Department of Microbio., Immunol. & Molec. Genet., University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3
Center for Innovative Materials and Architectures (INOMAR), Vietnam National University-Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 721337, Vietnam
4
Kansai Photon Science Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Hyogo 679-0198, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(7), 1341; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071341
Received: 28 May 2020 / Revised: 6 July 2020 / Accepted: 7 July 2020 / Published: 9 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiotherapy)
While conventional radiation therapy uses white X-rays that consist of a mixture of X-ray waves with various energy levels, a monochromatic X-ray (monoenergetic X-ray) has a single energy level. Irradiation of high-Z elements such as gold, silver or gadolinium with a synchrotron-generated monochromatic X-rays with the energy at or higher than their K-edge energy causes a photoelectric effect that includes release of the Auger electrons that induce DNA damage—leading to cell killing. Delivery of high-Z elements into cancer cells and tumor mass can be facilitated by the use of nanoparticles. Various types of nanoparticles containing high-Z elements have been developed. A recent addition to this growing list of nanoparticles is mesoporous silica-based nanoparticles (MSNs) containing gadolinium (Gd–MSN). The ability of Gd–MSN to inhibit tumor growth was demonstrated by evaluating effects of irradiating tumor spheroids with a precisely tuned monochromatic X-ray. View Full-Text
Keywords: monochromatic X-ray; mesoporous silica nanoparticles; high-Z elements; tumor spheroids monochromatic X-ray; mesoporous silica nanoparticles; high-Z elements; tumor spheroids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tamanoi, F.; Matsumoto, K.; Doan, T.L.H.; Shiro, A.; Saitoh, H. Studies on the Exposure of Gadolinium Containing Nanoparticles with Monochromatic X-rays Drive Advances in Radiation Therapy. Nanomaterials 2020, 10, 1341. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071341

AMA Style

Tamanoi F, Matsumoto K, Doan TLH, Shiro A, Saitoh H. Studies on the Exposure of Gadolinium Containing Nanoparticles with Monochromatic X-rays Drive Advances in Radiation Therapy. Nanomaterials. 2020; 10(7):1341. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071341

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko, Kotaro Matsumoto, Tan Le Hoang Doan, Ayumi Shiro, and Hiroyuki Saitoh. 2020. "Studies on the Exposure of Gadolinium Containing Nanoparticles with Monochromatic X-rays Drive Advances in Radiation Therapy" Nanomaterials 10, no. 7: 1341. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071341

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