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Open AccessArticle

Jewels Set in Stone: Hindu Temple Recipes in Medieval Cōḻa Epigraphy

Dept. of Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
Religions 2018, 9(9), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9090270
Received: 4 August 2018 / Revised: 25 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Food in Global and Historical Perspective )
Scholarship abounds on contemporary Hindu food offerings, yet there is scant literature treating the history of food in Hinduism beyond topics of food restrictions, purity, and food as medicine. A virtually unexplored archive is Hindu temple epigraphy from the time that was perhaps the theological height of embodied temple ritual practices, i.e., the Cōḻa period (ninth-thirteenth centuries CE). The vast archive of South Indian temple inscriptions allows a surprising glimpse into lived Hinduism as it was enacted daily, monthly, and annually through food offerings cooked in temple kitchens and served to gods residing in those temples. Through analyzing thousands of Tamiḻ inscriptions from the tenth through the fourteenth centuries CE, I have gleaned information concerning two distinct material cultural facets. (1) The practice of writing these rare but remarkable recipes which themselves are culinary textual artifacts has allowed us to access (2) Hindu food offerings of the past, also complex, sensory historical artifacts. In exploring these medieval religious recipes for the first time, I aim to show: the importance that food preparation held for temple devotees, the theological reality of feeding the actual bodies of the gods held in these temples, and the originality of the Cōḻa inscriptional corpus in bringing about a novel culinary writing practice that would be adopted more extensively in the Vijayanagara period (fourteenth-seventeenth centuries CE). This study, a radical new attempt at using historical sources inscribed in stone, sheds new light on medieval Hindu devotees’ priorities of serving and feeding god. The examination of this under-explored archive can help us move our academic analysis of Hindu food offerings beyond the hitherto utilized lenses of economics, sociology, and anthropology. Further, it contributes to our understanding of medieval temple worship, early culinary studies, and the history of food in India. View Full-Text
Keywords: food offerings; Hinduism; Hindu ritual; Tamiḻ epigraphy; feeding god; culinary history; recipe studies; Cōḻa temples; South Indian food; material religion food offerings; Hinduism; Hindu ritual; Tamiḻ epigraphy; feeding god; culinary history; recipe studies; Cōḻa temples; South Indian food; material religion
MDPI and ACS Style

Gutiérrez, A. Jewels Set in Stone: Hindu Temple Recipes in Medieval Cōḻa Epigraphy. Religions 2018, 9, 270. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9090270

AMA Style

Gutiérrez A. Jewels Set in Stone: Hindu Temple Recipes in Medieval Cōḻa Epigraphy. Religions. 2018; 9(9):270. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9090270

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gutiérrez, Andrea. 2018. "Jewels Set in Stone: Hindu Temple Recipes in Medieval Cōḻa Epigraphy" Religions 9, no. 9: 270. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9090270

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