Next Article in Journal
Michael Edwards: A Poet’s Vision of the Untimely Message of God
Previous Article in Journal
Renewing a Prophetic Mysticism for Teaching Children Justly: A Lasallian Provocation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Like a Fierce God: Reenvisioning the Enemy in the Legend of Empress Jingū in the Wake of the Mongol Invasions
 
 
Editorial

Aspects of Medieval Japanese Religion

1
Department of Religion, Columbia University, 1140 Amsterdam Ave. 407 Kent Hall, MC 3907, New York, NY 10027, USA
2
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University, 1140 Amsterdam Ave. 407 Kent Hall, MC 3907, New York, NY 10027, USA
3
Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of International Studies, Nagoya City University, 1 Yamanohata, Mizuho-chō, Nagoya 467-8501, Japan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2022, 13(10), 894; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13100894
Received: 28 July 2022 / Accepted: 11 August 2022 / Published: 23 September 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aspects of Medieval Japanese Religion)
The focus of this Special Issue is on medieval Japanese religion. Although Kamakura “new” Buddhist schools are usually taken as unquestioned landmarks of the medieval religious landscape, it is necessary to add complexity to this static picture in order to grasp the dynamic and hybrid character of the religious practices and theories that were produced during this historical period. This Special Issue will shed light on the diversity of medieval Japanese religion by adopting a wide range of analytical approaches, encompassing various fields of knowledge such as history, philosophy, materiality, literature, medical studies, and body theories. Its purpose is to expand the interpretative boundaries of medieval Japanese religion beyond Buddhism by emphasizing the importance of mountain asceticism (Shugendō), Yin and Yang (Onmyōdō) rituals, medical and soteriological practices, combinatory paradigms between local gods and Buddhist deities (medieval Shintō), hagiographies, religious cartography, conflations between performative arts and medieval Shintō mythologies, and material culture. This issue will foster scholarly comprehension of medieval Japanese religion as a growing network of heterogeneous religious traditions in permanent dialogue and reciprocal transformation. While there is a moderate amount of works that address some of the aspects described above, there is yet no publication attempting to embrace all these interrelated elements within a single volume. The present issue will attempt to make up for this lack. At the same time, it will provide a crucial contribution to the broad field of premodern Japanese religions, demonstrating the inadequacy of a rigid interpretative approach based on sectarian divisions and doctrinal separation. Our project underlines the hermeneutical importance of developing a polyphonic vision of the multifarious reality that lies at the core of medieval Japanese religion. View Full-Text
Keywords: medieval Japanese religion; Buddhism; Shugendō; Onmyōdō; Shintō; kami; buddhas; materiality; body theory; actor-network theory medieval Japanese religion; Buddhism; Shugendō; Onmyōdō; Shintō; kami; buddhas; materiality; body theory; actor-network theory
MDPI and ACS Style

Faure, B.R.; Castiglioni, A. Aspects of Medieval Japanese Religion. Religions 2022, 13, 894. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13100894

AMA Style

Faure BR, Castiglioni A. Aspects of Medieval Japanese Religion. Religions. 2022; 13(10):894. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13100894

Chicago/Turabian Style

Faure, Bernard R., and Andrea Castiglioni. 2022. "Aspects of Medieval Japanese Religion" Religions 13, no. 10: 894. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13100894

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop