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Article

Equality of Access? Chinese Women Practicing Chan and Transnational Meditation in Contemporary China

Department of Social Sciences, The Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Academic Editor: Pascale F. Engelmajer
Religions 2022, 13(1), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13010061
Received: 26 October 2021 / Revised: 31 December 2021 / Accepted: 6 January 2022 / Published: 10 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Buddhist Women's Religiosity: Contemporary Feminist Perspectives)
This paper examines how the Buddhist revival, the Chan revival, and recent popularity of transnational meditation practices have facilitated Chinese women practicing Buddhist meditation in contemporary China. With the influence of the opening of China and growing transnational networks, there has been an increasing number of Han Chinese monastics and lay people practicing transnational meditation, such as samādhi, vipassanā and mindfulness, in the past two decades. Despite the restriction of accessing Chan halls at monasteries, some Chinese nuns and laywomen have traveled to learn meditation in different parts of China, and international meditation centers in Southeast Asia to study with yogis from all over the world. Surprisingly some returned female travelers have taken significant roles in organizing meditation retreats, and establishing meditation centers and meditation halls. Through examining some ethnographic cases of Chinese nuns and laywomen, this paper argues that the transnational meditation movement has an impact not only on gender equality, especially concerning Chinese women practicing meditation, but also on the development of contemporary Chinese Buddhism. The significant role of Chinese female meditators in promoting Buddhist meditation can reflect a trend of re-positioning the Chan School in contemporary China. View Full-Text
Keywords: Chan; transnational meditation; Han Chinese; nuns; women Chan; transnational meditation; Han Chinese; nuns; women
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lau, N.-S. Equality of Access? Chinese Women Practicing Chan and Transnational Meditation in Contemporary China. Religions 2022, 13, 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13010061

AMA Style

Lau N-S. Equality of Access? Chinese Women Practicing Chan and Transnational Meditation in Contemporary China. Religions. 2022; 13(1):61. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13010061

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lau, Ngar-Sze. 2022. "Equality of Access? Chinese Women Practicing Chan and Transnational Meditation in Contemporary China" Religions 13, no. 1: 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13010061

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