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The Hybrid Researcher: Entering the Field, Ethnography and Research among Dutch Muslim Women from 2009 to 2019

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9190501, Israel
Academic Editor: Halim Rane
Religions 2021, 12(4), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12040278
Received: 13 March 2021 / Revised: 8 April 2021 / Accepted: 13 April 2021 / Published: 16 April 2021
This paper focuses on ethnography among Dutch Muslim women who chose to practice Islam (whether they were born Muslim, known as ‘Newly practicing Muslims,’ or they chose to convert, known as ‘New Muslims’), which is often considered by the native Dutch population as a religion oppressive to women. This paper is part of a larger project that seeks to understand how these Dutch Muslim women build their identity in a way that it is both Dutch and Muslim, whether or not they mix Dutch parameters in their Muslim identity, while at the same time intersplicing Islamic principles in their Dutch senses of self. This study is based on an annual ethnography conducted in the city of Amsterdam from September 2009 to October 2019, that combines insights taken from in-depth interviews with Dutch Muslimas, observations in gatherings for Quranic and Religious studies, observations in a mosque located in a block of neighborhoods with a high percentage of immigrant and Muslim populations, and one-time events occurring during special times (i.e., Ramadan, the summer, Christmas, and the Burka Ban). This paper has a special focus on the ethnography and the positionality of the author as a researcher who is both an insider and outsider in this specific field and her subjective experiences that could be methodologically relevant for other scholars and ethnographers. This paper will explore the techniques that helped the author enter the field, collect data for this ethnography and the construction of knowledge in this specific field, including the insider–outsider axis, code switching, emotions and assumptions in the field and positionality, which will all be explained in detail. This paper takes the reader on the journey of entering the field and shows them the various techniques that were used to enter the field in order to build report and trust between the researcher and the participants in this study. View Full-Text
Keywords: religion; ethnography; qualitative research; Islam; Dutch Islam; religion in Europe; agency; women in conservative religions; religious conversion; Identity; culture; immigration; women in Islam religion; ethnography; qualitative research; Islam; Dutch Islam; religion in Europe; agency; women in conservative religions; religious conversion; Identity; culture; immigration; women in Islam
MDPI and ACS Style

Hass, B.s. The Hybrid Researcher: Entering the Field, Ethnography and Research among Dutch Muslim Women from 2009 to 2019. Religions 2021, 12, 278. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12040278

AMA Style

Hass Bs. The Hybrid Researcher: Entering the Field, Ethnography and Research among Dutch Muslim Women from 2009 to 2019. Religions. 2021; 12(4):278. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12040278

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hass, Bat s. 2021. "The Hybrid Researcher: Entering the Field, Ethnography and Research among Dutch Muslim Women from 2009 to 2019" Religions 12, no. 4: 278. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12040278

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