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Article

Islamic Studies in Australia’s Universities

by 1,* and 2,*
1
Centre for Islamic Studies and Civilisation, Charles Sturt University, Melbourne 3062, Australia
2
Centre for Islamic Studies and Civilisation, Charles Sturt University, Sydney 2144, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Halim Rane
Religions 2021, 12(2), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020099
Received: 15 November 2020 / Revised: 26 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 1 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Islamic and Muslim Studies in Australia)
Islamic studies is an in-demand discipline area in Australia, including both classical Islamic studies and contemporary Islamic studies. While the field of classical Islamic studies has evolved over the centuries alongside the needs of the societies it serves, it has, nevertheless, remained within a well-established Islamic framework. This type of knowledge is sought by many, especially Muslims. Contemporary Islamic studies also plays a critical role in understanding Islam and Muslims in the contemporary context. The higher education sector in Australia contributes to this knowledge base via the Islamic studies courses it offers. This article discusses the positioning of the higher education sector in fulfilling Islamic educational needs, especially in the presence of other non-accredited education institutions such as mosques and madrasas. Despite the presence of other educational institutions, the higher educational sector appeals to a large pool of students, as evidenced by the number of Islamic studies courses offered by fourteen Australian universities. The teaching of classical Islamic studies in the higher education sector is not without its challenges. These challenges can be overcome and have been overcome to a large degree by the Centre for Islamic Studies and Civilisation (CISAC), Charles Sturt University (CSU). CISAC was used as a case study, as it is the largest Islamic studies department offering the greatest number of classical Islamic studies focused courses with the highest number of Islamic studies students in Australia. This article, overall, demonstrates that there is an ongoing need for Islamic studies to be taught, both in a classical and contemporary capacity, in the higher education sector. View Full-Text
Keywords: Islamic studies; Islamic higher education; Muslim students; Islam in university; Islam in Australia; classical Islamic studies; contemporary Islamic studies; CSU; ISRA; CISAC Islamic studies; Islamic higher education; Muslim students; Islam in university; Islam in Australia; classical Islamic studies; contemporary Islamic studies; CSU; ISRA; CISAC
MDPI and ACS Style

Keskin, Z.; Ozalp, M. Islamic Studies in Australia’s Universities. Religions 2021, 12, 99. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020099

AMA Style

Keskin Z, Ozalp M. Islamic Studies in Australia’s Universities. Religions. 2021; 12(2):99. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020099

Chicago/Turabian Style

Keskin, Zuleyha, and Mehmet Ozalp. 2021. "Islamic Studies in Australia’s Universities" Religions 12, no. 2: 99. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020099

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