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Migration, Interfaith Engagement, and Mission among Somali Refugees in Kenya: Assessing the Cape Town Commitment from a Global South Perspective One Decade On

Department of Peace and International Studies, Daystar University, Nairobi 00100, Kenya
Academic Editor: Carlos F. Cardoza-Orlandi
Religions 2021, 12(2), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020129
Received: 4 January 2021 / Revised: 5 February 2021 / Accepted: 12 February 2021 / Published: 18 February 2021
In the last decade, since the Third Lausanne Congress on World Evangelization (2010) in Cape Town, South Africa, the world has significantly changed. The majority of the world’s Christians are located in the Global South. Globalization, conflict, and migration have catalyzed the emergence of multifaith communities. All these developments have in one way or another impacted missions in twenty-first-century sub-Saharan Africa. As both Christianity and Islam are spreading and expanding, new approaches to a peaceful and harmonious coexistence have been developed that seem to be hampering the mission of the Church as delineated in the Cape Town Commitment (2010). Hence a missiological assessment of the Cape Town Commitment is imperative for the new decade’s crosscutting developments and challenges. In this article, the author contends that the mission theology of the 2010 Lausanne Congress no longer addresses the contemporary complex reality of a multifaith context occasioned by refugee crises in Kenya. The article will also describe the Somali refugee situation in Nairobi, Kenya, occasioned by political instability and violence in Somalia. Finally, the article will propose a methodology for performing missions for interfaith engagement in Nairobi’s Eastleigh refugee centers in the post Cape Town Commitment era. The overall goal is to provide mainstream evangelical mission models that are biblically sound, culturally appropriate, and tolerant to the multifaith diversity in conflict areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: mission/missions; interfaith; global south; globalization; migration; refugees mission/missions; interfaith; global south; globalization; migration; refugees
MDPI and ACS Style

Munyao, M. Migration, Interfaith Engagement, and Mission among Somali Refugees in Kenya: Assessing the Cape Town Commitment from a Global South Perspective One Decade On. Religions 2021, 12, 129. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020129

AMA Style

Munyao M. Migration, Interfaith Engagement, and Mission among Somali Refugees in Kenya: Assessing the Cape Town Commitment from a Global South Perspective One Decade On. Religions. 2021; 12(2):129. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020129

Chicago/Turabian Style

Munyao, Martin. 2021. "Migration, Interfaith Engagement, and Mission among Somali Refugees in Kenya: Assessing the Cape Town Commitment from a Global South Perspective One Decade On" Religions 12, no. 2: 129. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020129

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