Next Article in Journal
An Action Research Framework for Religion and the Stigma of Suicide
Next Article in Special Issue
Political Rhetoric and Hate Speech in the Case of Shamima Begum
Previous Article in Journal
Understanding Folk Religiosity in the Philippines
Previous Article in Special Issue
Problematising the Official Athens Mosque: Between Mere Place of Worship and 21st Century ‘Trojan Horse’
Article

Muslim Stand-Up Comedy in the US and the UK: Incongruity, Everydayness, and Performativity

Humanities Department, Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Society and Culture (CISSC), Concordia University, Montreal, QC H3G 2V4, Canada
Academic Editors: Chris Allen and Christina Verousi
Religions 2021, 12(10), 801; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100801
Received: 17 August 2021 / Revised: 6 September 2021 / Accepted: 10 September 2021 / Published: 26 September 2021
The objectives of this article are two-fold: to provide a review of the major figures and trends in Muslim American comedy and discuss certain techniques and approaches that have been used by stand-up comedians to counter predominant and discriminatory perceptions of the “Other”. To reiterate film critic Jack Shaheen’s argument in Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People, the Western public is fed constructions of Islam as a “problem”; the terms “Arab” and “Muslim” are interchangeably used; Muslim men are depicted as “terrorists”; and Muslim women are depicted as “veiled and oppressed”. Much has been written on the generation and effect of stereotypes promoted by popular culture. However, stereotyped groups also use popular culture to speak for themselves. Popular culture also functions to resist, counter, push back against, and subvert stereotypes. In other words, the “Other” can speak for him or herself through popular culture as a means of contesting stereotypes that define Muslims and Arabs in terms of cultural and religious understandings that narrowly categorize individuals through attributes such as religiosity and femininity. This potential is being realized by second-generation Muslims familiar with the platforms created and provided by other marginalized groups in Anglo-American popular culture, and their work has come into its own especially in the aftermath of 9/11, a time that saw both the intensification of stereotypes and heightening of Muslim American consciousness. I concentrate on these specific stand-up comedians in the US and the UK, despite the fact that there are others in the diaspora who discuss Islamophobia, because these American and British comedians address all of the three most common stereotypes of Muslims: “Arab = Muslim”, the “terrorist”, and the “veiled and oppressed woman”. View Full-Text
Keywords: Islamophobia; stereotypes; Muslim stand-up comedy; US; UK; Tissa Hami; Shazia Mirza Islamophobia; stereotypes; Muslim stand-up comedy; US; UK; Tissa Hami; Shazia Mirza
MDPI and ACS Style

Aidi, L. Muslim Stand-Up Comedy in the US and the UK: Incongruity, Everydayness, and Performativity. Religions 2021, 12, 801. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100801

AMA Style

Aidi L. Muslim Stand-Up Comedy in the US and the UK: Incongruity, Everydayness, and Performativity. Religions. 2021; 12(10):801. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100801

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aidi, Lamiae. 2021. "Muslim Stand-Up Comedy in the US and the UK: Incongruity, Everydayness, and Performativity" Religions 12, no. 10: 801. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100801

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop