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Article

Perspectives on Inclusive Education: Need for Muslim Children’s Literature

ITREB Canada, 49 Wynford Drive, North York, ON M3C1K1, Canada
Religions 2020, 11(9), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11090450
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 13 August 2020 / Accepted: 21 August 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Critical Perspectives on Islamic Education)
Muslim students and communities in Western sociopolitical and educational contexts confront substantive challenges of racisms, Islamophobia, and under- and misrepresentations in media as well as in literature. Creating a robust repertoire of curricular resources for teaching and learning, teacher development programs, and schooling in general offers a promise of developing classroom practices, which in turn promotes an inclusive discourse that recognizes the unique position and presence of a Muslim child. The present article examines the prospects of developing such a curriculum called Muslim Children’s Literature for inclusive schooling and teacher development programs in the context of public education in Ontario, Canada. It is situated in the larger umbrella of creating specific theory and methodology for education that lend exposure to Muslim cultures and civilizations. Development of such a literature as curricular resources addresses the questions of Muslim identities through curriculum perceptions so as to initiate critical conversations around various educational challenges that the development and dissemination of Muslim curricular resources faces today. I make a case for developing Muslim Children’s Literature to combat the challenges of having limited repertoire to engage with Muslim students in public schools and teacher candidates in teacher development programs. With the description of the necessity of such a literature, this article outlines characteristics of the proposed genre of Muslim Children’s Literature, as well as the unique position of a Muslim child in the current educational scenarios. A brief peek into select fiction on Muslim themes available in English internationally that can be used as curricular resources at elementary and secondary level serves towards reinforcing the definition of Muslim Children’s Literature. Further, these offer a sample that may be promoted under the proposed genre of Muslim Children’s Literature. View Full-Text
Keywords: inclusive education; Islamic education; Islamophobia; Muslim child; Muslim Children’s Literature; teacher development; curriculum development inclusive education; Islamic education; Islamophobia; Muslim child; Muslim Children’s Literature; teacher development; curriculum development
MDPI and ACS Style

Panjwani, A.A. Perspectives on Inclusive Education: Need for Muslim Children’s Literature. Religions 2020, 11, 450. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11090450

AMA Style

Panjwani AA. Perspectives on Inclusive Education: Need for Muslim Children’s Literature. Religions. 2020; 11(9):450. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11090450

Chicago/Turabian Style

Panjwani, Antum A. 2020. "Perspectives on Inclusive Education: Need for Muslim Children’s Literature" Religions 11, no. 9: 450. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11090450

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