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Addendum published on 14 December 2020, see Religions 2020, 11(12), 668.
Article

For Whom the Bell Tolls: Practitioners’ Views on Bell-Ringing Practice in Contemporary Society in New South Wales (Australia)

1
School of Environmental Sciences, Charles Sturt University, P.O. Box 789, Albury, NSW 2640, Australia
2
Institute for Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, P.O. Box 789, Albury, NSW 2640, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2020, 11(8), 425; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080425
Received: 10 July 2020 / Revised: 9 August 2020 / Accepted: 13 August 2020 / Published: 17 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music, Sound, and the Sacred)
For centuries, religious buildings have been using bells to call the faithful to prayer. Bell-ringing activity on church premises does not serve a purely religious function, however, as people in the community may perceive this activity secularly, attributing their own meanings and significances towards these sounds. If bell ringing (or the actual sound) were found to have great significance to a specific community, denomination, or a regionality bracket, this may have future implications in any management of these resources. There is a need to hear the voices of the actual practitioners and their perceptions regarding what they, their congregations, and their host communities feel. This paper represents the first large-scale assessment of the views of practitioners of five major Christian denominations with regards to bell-ringing practice and its role in contemporary society. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultural heritage; soundscapes; clergy and liturgy; church bells; noise pollution cultural heritage; soundscapes; clergy and liturgy; church bells; noise pollution
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MDPI and ACS Style

Parker, M.; Spennemann, D.H.R. For Whom the Bell Tolls: Practitioners’ Views on Bell-Ringing Practice in Contemporary Society in New South Wales (Australia). Religions 2020, 11, 425. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080425

AMA Style

Parker M, Spennemann DHR. For Whom the Bell Tolls: Practitioners’ Views on Bell-Ringing Practice in Contemporary Society in New South Wales (Australia). Religions. 2020; 11(8):425. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080425

Chicago/Turabian Style

Parker, Murray, and Dirk H.R. Spennemann. 2020. "For Whom the Bell Tolls: Practitioners’ Views on Bell-Ringing Practice in Contemporary Society in New South Wales (Australia)" Religions 11, no. 8: 425. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080425

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