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Complex, Critical and Caring: Young People’s Diverse Religious, Spiritual and Non-Religious Worldviews in Australia and Canada

1
School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC 3125, Australia
2
Department of Classics and Religious Studies, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
3
School of Religion, Queens’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
4
School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3125, Australia
5
School of Sociology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
6
School of Social Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2020, 11(4), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11040166
Received: 12 February 2020 / Revised: 9 March 2020 / Accepted: 30 March 2020 / Published: 3 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion, Power, and Resistance: New Ideas for a Divided World)
Recent scholarly and media perspectives on religion and youth have often depicted young people as being apathetic when it comes to religion. The methods used in research on religion are also typically informed by outdated, fixed idea of religious identity that are no longer applicable, especially to young people. This paper confronts these issues by applying contemporary theories of religious diversity, including lived religion and religious complexity, to the findings of the Canadian Religion, Gender and Sexuality among Youth in Canada (RGSY) study, the Australian Interaction multifaith youth movement project, and the Worldviews of Australian Generation Z (AGZ) study. These three studies revealed that young people negotiate their worldview identities in complex, critical and caring ways that are far from ambivalent, and that are characterised by hybridity and questioning. We thereby recommend that policies and curricula pertaining to young people’s and societies’ wellbeing better reflect young people’s actual lived experiences of diversity. View Full-Text
Keywords: religion; diversity; young people; spirituality; non-religion; complexity; hybridity religion; diversity; young people; spirituality; non-religion; complexity; hybridity
MDPI and ACS Style

Halafoff, A.; Shipley, H.; Young, P.D.; Singleton, A.; Rasmussen, M.L.; Bouma, G. Complex, Critical and Caring: Young People’s Diverse Religious, Spiritual and Non-Religious Worldviews in Australia and Canada. Religions 2020, 11, 166.

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