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Open AccessArticle

“True, Masculine Men Are Not Like Women!”: Salafism between Extremism and Democracy

Department of Ethnology, History of religions, and Gender Studies, Stockholm University, 114 19 Stockholm, Sweden
Religions 2020, 11(3), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11030118
Received: 27 January 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 5 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salafism in the West)
Whether we should understand Salafism in general as a security threat, as extremist, and as un-democratic and of concern to authorities is a debated question. In the article, this policy-oriented objective is addressed through an analysis of a specific non-violent Salafi ideology in Sweden, which is compared to the Swedish government’s definition of gender equality. The basic argument in this article is that we can use words like “extreme” as relational concepts, which makes them analytically useful, i.e., when the benchmark is clearly defined. View Full-Text
Keywords: democracy; equality; extremism; gender; Salafism; non-violence democracy; equality; extremism; gender; Salafism; non-violence
MDPI and ACS Style

Olsson, S. “True, Masculine Men Are Not Like Women!”: Salafism between Extremism and Democracy. Religions 2020, 11, 118.

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