Next Article in Journal
A Sketch on Daisaku Ikeda as a Jamesian Psychologist of Religion
Next Article in Special Issue
‘An Unstoppable Force for Good’?: How Neoliberal Governance Facilitated the Growth of Australian Suburban-Based Pentecostal Megachurches
Previous Article in Journal
Comparative Hagiology and/as Manuscript Studies: Method and Materiality
Previous Article in Special Issue
Constructing the Problem of Religious Freedom: An Analysis of Australian Government Inquiries into Religious Freedom
Open AccessArticle

Social Cohesion in Australia: Comparing Church and Community

1
NCLS Research and Public and Contextual Theology Research Centre, Charles Sturt University, Waterloo, NSW 2017, Australia
2
ARTS, School of Social Sciences, Monash University, Caulfield Campus, Caulfield East, VIC 3145, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2019, 10(11), 605; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10110605
Received: 30 September 2019 / Revised: 24 October 2019 / Accepted: 25 October 2019 / Published: 1 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion in Australian Public Life: Resurgence, Insurgence, Cooption?)
In a context of increasing ethnic and religious diversity, Australia’s future prosperity may depend, in part, on the ability to maintain social cohesion. Drawing on the framework developed by the Scanlon Foundation Social Cohesion Research Program, this study examines data from the 2016 National Church Life Survey and the 2016 Australian Community Survey to compare levels of social cohesion among Australian churchgoers and among the general population. Social cohesion metrics were stronger among churchgoers than the wider population across the domains of belonging, social justice, civic participation, acceptance of others and worth. Differences were also observed between Christian denominations on most domains, but with few exceptions, social cohesion among churchgoers from each denomination was still higher than that observed for all Australians. The findings suggest that Christian groups play a positive role in the promotion of social cohesion by building both bridging and bonding social capital among those who participate, but that these groups are unlikely to be a significant source of agitation to prevent some of the greatest contemporary threats to social cohesion. View Full-Text
Keywords: social cohesion; social capital; Christianity; religious service attendance; cultural diversity; religious diversity; migration; Australia social cohesion; social capital; Christianity; religious service attendance; cultural diversity; religious diversity; migration; Australia
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Pepper, M.; Powell, R.; Bouma, G.D. Social Cohesion in Australia: Comparing Church and Community. Religions 2019, 10, 605.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop