Next Article in Journal
Weather-Routing System Based on METOC Navigation Risk Assessment
Next Article in Special Issue
Interdecadal Foredune Changes along the Southeast Australian Coastline: 1942–2014
Previous Article in Journal
Recent Evolution (1956–2017) of Rodas Beach on the Cíes Islands, Galicia, NW Spain
Previous Article in Special Issue
Spatial Variability of Coastal Foredune Evolution, Part A: Timescales of Months to Years
Open AccessArticle

Assessing Natural and Mechanical Dune Performance in a Post-Hurricane Environment

Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(5), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7050126
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 29 April 2019 / Published: 2 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Dune Dynamics and Management)
The purpose of this study is to document the geomorphic evolution of a mechanical dune over approximately one year following its installation and compare it to the recovery of a natural dune following the impact of Hurricane Matthew (2016). During the study period, the dunes’ integrity was tested by wave and wind events, including king tides, and a second hurricane (Irma, 2017), at the end of the study period. Prior to the impact of the second hurricane, the volumetric increase of the mechanical and natural dune was 32% and 75%, respectively, suggesting that scraping alone is not the optimal protection method. If scraping is employed, we advocate that the dune should be augmented by planting. Ideally, the storm-impacted dune should naturally recover. Post-storm vegetation regrowth was lower around the mechanical dune, which encouraged aeolian transport and dune deflation. Hurricane Irma, an extreme forcing event, substantially impacted the dunes. The natural dune was scarped and the mechanical dune was overtopped; the system was essentially left homogeneous following the hurricane. The results from this study question the current practice of sand scraping along the South Carolina coast, which occurs post-storm, emplacement along the former primary dune line, and does not include the planting of vegetation. View Full-Text
Keywords: coastal stabilization; dune recovery; hurricane impact; aeolian geomorphology; beach scraping coastal stabilization; dune recovery; hurricane impact; aeolian geomorphology; beach scraping
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ellis, J.T.; Román-Rivera, M.A. Assessing Natural and Mechanical Dune Performance in a Post-Hurricane Environment. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7, 126.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop