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Review

Amphiatlantic Dolphins’ Prey: Indicators of Speciation, Trophic Competition and Global Warming? A Review

by
Liliana Olaya-Ponzone
1,2,*,
Rocío Espada Ruíz
1,
Daniel Patón Domínguez
3 and
José Carlos García-Gómez
1,2,*
1
Laboratory of Marine Biology, Department of Zoology, Faculty of Biology, University of Seville, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
2
Seville Aquarium I+D+i Research Area, Seville Aquarium, 41012 Seville, Spain
3
Ecology Unit, Faculty of Sciences, University of Extremadura, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(6), 978; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12060978
Submission received: 22 April 2024 / Revised: 22 May 2024 / Accepted: 29 May 2024 / Published: 11 June 2024
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation)

Abstract

A review of the prey of three amphiatlantic dolphin species, Tursiops truncatus, Stenella coeruleoalba and Delphinus delphis, is carried out. The main objective of this work is to review the feeding of these species in the Atlantic in order to assess the degrees of trophic competition and speciation pressure. A total of 103 fish families, 22 cephalopod families and 19 crustacean families have been counted, from which the species identified to the genus level only included seventy-one fish, twenty cephalopods and five crustaceans, and the total species identified included three-hundred-one fish, fifty cephalopods and twenty-six crustaceans. The most consumed prey were fish, followed by cephalopods and crustaceans. The exclusive prey consumed by each of the three dolphin species, as well as those shared by all or at least two of them, have also been counted. T. truncatus is the most general; however, the western Atlantic populations exhibit high dietary specialization compared to the eastern Atlantic populations, reflecting strong speciation pressure on both sides of the Atlantic. D. delphis and S. coeruleoalba, despite their amphiatlantism, have hardly been studied in the western Atlantic, except for a few references in the southern hemisphere, so the fundamental differences between the two species and their comparison with T. truncatus have been established with records from the eastern Atlantic. All three dolphin species have been observed to be expanding, especially D. delphis. This northward expansion and that of their prey is discussed.
Keywords: Tursiops; Delphinus; Stenella; food; feeding; Delphinidae; depth; climate change; Atlantic Tursiops; Delphinus; Stenella; food; feeding; Delphinidae; depth; climate change; Atlantic

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MDPI and ACS Style

Olaya-Ponzone, L.; Ruíz, R.E.; Domínguez, D.P.; García-Gómez, J.C. Amphiatlantic Dolphins’ Prey: Indicators of Speciation, Trophic Competition and Global Warming? A Review. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12, 978. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12060978

AMA Style

Olaya-Ponzone L, Ruíz RE, Domínguez DP, García-Gómez JC. Amphiatlantic Dolphins’ Prey: Indicators of Speciation, Trophic Competition and Global Warming? A Review. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 2024; 12(6):978. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12060978

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olaya-Ponzone, Liliana, Rocío Espada Ruíz, Daniel Patón Domínguez, and José Carlos García-Gómez. 2024. "Amphiatlantic Dolphins’ Prey: Indicators of Speciation, Trophic Competition and Global Warming? A Review" Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 12, no. 6: 978. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12060978

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