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Open AccessArticle

Research Advances in Adopting Drip Irrigation for California Organic Spinach: Preliminary Findings

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Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California, UCCE Imperial County, 1050 East Holton Road, Holtville, CA 92250, USA
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Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California, UCCE Monterey County, 1432 Abbott Street, Salinas, CA 93901, USA
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Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2019, 9(8), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9080177
Received: 13 June 2019 / Revised: 6 August 2019 / Accepted: 6 August 2019 / Published: 9 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Irrigation)
The main objective of this study was to explore the viability of drip irrigation for organic spinach production and the management of spinach downy mildew disease in California. The experiment was conducted over two crop seasons at the University of California Desert Research and Extension Center located in the low desert of California. Various combinations of dripline spacings and installation depths were assessed and compared with sprinkler irrigation as control treatment. Comprehensive data collection was carried out to fully understand the differences between the irrigation treatments. Statistical analysis indicated very strong evidence for an overall effect of the irrigation system on spinach fresh yields, while the number of driplines in bed had a significant impact on the shoot biomass yield. The developed canopy crop curves revealed that the leaf density of drip irrigation treatments was slightly behind (1–4 days, depending on the irrigation treatment and crop season) that of the sprinkler irrigation treatment in time. The results also demonstrated an overall effect of irrigation treatment on downy mildew, in which downy mildew incidence was lower in plots irrigated by drips following emergence when compared to the sprinkler. The study concluded that drip irrigation has the potential to be used to produce organic spinach, conserve water, enhance the efficiency of water use, and manage downy mildew, but further work is required to optimize system design, irrigation, and nitrogen management practices, as well as strategies to maintain productivity and economic viability of utilizing drip irrigation for spinach. View Full-Text
Keywords: downy mildew; drip irrigation; irrigation management; organic production; spinach downy mildew; drip irrigation; irrigation management; organic production; spinach
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Montazar, A.; Cahn, M.; Putman, A. Research Advances in Adopting Drip Irrigation for California Organic Spinach: Preliminary Findings. Agriculture 2019, 9, 177.

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