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Correction published on 18 September 2013, see Agriculture 2013, 3(3), 596-598.
Open AccessReview

An Alternative Use of Horticultural Crops: Stressed Plants as Biofactories of Bioactive Phenolic Compounds

1
Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, School of Biotechnology and Food, Centro de Biotecnologia-FEMSA, Tecnologico de Monterrey-Campus Monterrey, E. Garza Sada 2501 Sur, C.P. 64849, Monterrey, N.L., Mexico
2
Vegetable & Fruit Improvement Center, Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2012, 2(3), 259-271; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture2030259
Received: 1 August 2012 / Revised: 13 September 2012 / Accepted: 14 September 2012 / Published: 24 September 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Food and Health: A Paradigm Shift in Agriculture)
Plants subjected to abiotic stresses synthesize secondary metabolites with potential application in the functional foods, dietary supplements, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and agrochemical markets. This approach can be extended to horticultural crops. This review describes previous reports regarding the effect of different postharvest abiotic stresses on the accumulation of phenolic compounds. Likewise, the physiological basis for the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds as an abiotic stress response is described. The information presented herein would be useful for growers and the fresh produce market which are interested in finding alternative uses for their crops, especially for those not meeting quality standards and thus are considered as waste. View Full-Text
Keywords: postharvest abiotic stresses; plants as biofactories; carrots; chlorogenic acid; dicaffeoylquinic acids; physiological stress response; stress signaling molecules postharvest abiotic stresses; plants as biofactories; carrots; chlorogenic acid; dicaffeoylquinic acids; physiological stress response; stress signaling molecules
MDPI and ACS Style

Jacobo-Velázquez, D.A.; Cisneros-Zevallos, L. An Alternative Use of Horticultural Crops: Stressed Plants as Biofactories of Bioactive Phenolic Compounds. Agriculture 2012, 2, 259-271.

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