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Article

Methane Emission and Milk Production from Jersey Cows Grazing Perennial Ryegrass–White Clover and Multispecies Forage Mixtures

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Institute of Plant Production and Plant Breeding, Grass and Forage Science/Organic Agriculture, Christian-Albrechts Universität zu Kiel (CAU), Hermann-Rodewald Straße 9, 24118 Kiel, Germany
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Grass Based Dairy Systems, Animal Production Systems Group, Wageningen University (WUR), 6700 AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Engineering Research and Development Unit (UTNBA), National Technological University, Regional School of Buenos Aires, National Council for Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires Medrano 951 (C1179AAQ), Argentina
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Department of Statistics, Christian-Albrechts Universität zu Kiel (CAU), 24118 Kiel, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Isabel Blanco-Penedo
Agriculture 2021, 11(2), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020175
Received: 22 January 2021 / Revised: 16 February 2021 / Accepted: 17 February 2021 / Published: 20 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Livestock: Impacts, Adaptation, and Mitigation)
Methane is a major constituent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from ruminants, and mitigation strategies are needed to alleviate this negative environmental impact while maintaining the environmental and other benefits of grazing systems. Forages containing plant-specialized metabolites (PSM), particularly condensed tannins, may help reduce enteric methane (CH4) emissions. However, information on in vivo CH4 emissions from cows grazing mixtures that contain bioactive herbs is scarce. Accordingly, this study compared a binary mixture of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and white clover (Trifolium repens) against a diverse mixture of six additional species, including tannin-rich species like birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor), in a full-grazing dairy system. Enteric CH4 emissions were measured using the SF6 tracer technique. Cows grazing diverse mixtures increased their energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield by 4% (p < 0.001) compared with binary mixtures. However, CH4 emissions per kg ECM were also 11% greater for the diverse mixtures (p < 0.05). The very high feed quality and milk yield from both mixtures explained the low CH4 emissions recorded relative to the milk output. The addition of forbs did not provide additional benefits at these intensities, as they were maintained in low yield shares throughout. View Full-Text
Keywords: polyphenols; climate smart agriculture; biodiversity; pasture; tannins; forage production polyphenols; climate smart agriculture; biodiversity; pasture; tannins; forage production
MDPI and ACS Style

Loza, C.; Reinsch, T.; Loges, R.; Taube, F.; Gere, J.I.; Kluß, C.; Hasler, M.; Malisch, C.S. Methane Emission and Milk Production from Jersey Cows Grazing Perennial Ryegrass–White Clover and Multispecies Forage Mixtures. Agriculture 2021, 11, 175. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020175

AMA Style

Loza C, Reinsch T, Loges R, Taube F, Gere JI, Kluß C, Hasler M, Malisch CS. Methane Emission and Milk Production from Jersey Cows Grazing Perennial Ryegrass–White Clover and Multispecies Forage Mixtures. Agriculture. 2021; 11(2):175. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020175

Chicago/Turabian Style

Loza, Cecilia, Thorsten Reinsch, Ralf Loges, Friedhelm Taube, José I. Gere, Christof Kluß, Mario Hasler, and Carsten S. Malisch 2021. "Methane Emission and Milk Production from Jersey Cows Grazing Perennial Ryegrass–White Clover and Multispecies Forage Mixtures" Agriculture 11, no. 2: 175. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020175

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