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Article

Sugar Beet Shoot and Root Phenotypic Plasticity to Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium and Lime Omission

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Crop Science, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, University of Bonn, Katzenburgweg 5, 53115 Bonn, Germany
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Agroecology and Organic Farming, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 6, 53121 Bonn, Germany
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Soil Science and Soil Ecology, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, University of Bonn, Nussallee 13, 53115 Bonn, Germany
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Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2021, 11(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11010021
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 21 December 2020 / Accepted: 29 December 2020 / Published: 31 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Root-Soil Interactions in Organic Farming)
In low input agriculture, a thorough understanding of the plant-nutrient interactions plays a central role. This study aims to investigate the effects of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and liming omission on shoot growth as well as on topsoil root biomass, growth and morphology (tuber and fibrous roots) of sugar beet grown under field conditions at the Dikopshof long-term fertilizer experiment (Germany). Classical shoot observation methods were combined with root morphology and link measurements using an image analysis program. Omission of the nutrients N, P and K as well as of liming led to a significant decrease in shoot growth. Tuber yield was lowest for the unfertilized and the K omission treatment. The root shoot ratio was highest in the N deficient treatment. In the K omission treatment, a strategic change from a less herringbone root type (early stage) to a more herringbone root type (late stage), which is more efficient for the acquisition of mobile nutrients, was observed. By contrast, a change from a more herringbone (early stage) to a less herringbone root type (late stage) which is less expensive to produce and maintain was observed in the unfertilized treatment. We conclude that sugar beet alters its root morphology as a nutrient acquisition strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrient omission; root coring; specific root length; root link analysis; root to shoot ratio; leaf area index; fibrous roots nutrient omission; root coring; specific root length; root link analysis; root to shoot ratio; leaf area index; fibrous roots
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hadir, S.; Gaiser, T.; Hüging, H.; Athmann, M.; Pfarr, D.; Kemper, R.; Ewert, F.; Seidel, S. Sugar Beet Shoot and Root Phenotypic Plasticity to Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium and Lime Omission. Agriculture 2021, 11, 21. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11010021

AMA Style

Hadir S, Gaiser T, Hüging H, Athmann M, Pfarr D, Kemper R, Ewert F, Seidel S. Sugar Beet Shoot and Root Phenotypic Plasticity to Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium and Lime Omission. Agriculture. 2021; 11(1):21. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11010021

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hadir, Sofia, Thomas Gaiser, Hubert Hüging, Miriam Athmann, Daniel Pfarr, Roman Kemper, Frank Ewert, and Sabine Seidel. 2021. "Sugar Beet Shoot and Root Phenotypic Plasticity to Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium and Lime Omission" Agriculture 11, no. 1: 21. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11010021

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