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Article

Sociocultural Mechanisms Concerning Cropping Systems in Mountain Agriculture: A Case Study of the Eastern Slopes of Tanzania’s Uluguru Mountains

International Cooperation Center for Agricultural Education, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan
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Agriculture 2020, 10(9), 377; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10090377
Received: 1 July 2020 / Revised: 21 August 2020 / Accepted: 21 August 2020 / Published: 27 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cropping Systems: Implications on Climate and Environment)
In agricultural science, the establishment of a given cropping system in mountainous areas is often understood from the relationship between differences of altitude-specific, agroecological conditions and crop cultivation characteristics. However, social factors can also play a role. We aimed to clarify how the cropping system is maintained through examining sociocultural factors, specifically land tenure and marriage systems, in an agricultural community in rural mountainous Africa. Several surveys based on participatory observation accompanied by home stays were conducted to determine people who participated in cropping systems and to understand which social system maintained the cropping system. We found that around 70% of target households in Kiboguwa village cultivated three staple crops (maize, cassava and rice) using the same cropping system and almost no farmers outside the village used the village’s sloped fields, meaning that the villagers maintained the cropping system. Households acquired nearby sloped fields by various means such as inheriting land through maternal lineage of household heads or wives. We observed virilocal and uxorilocal residence at similar degrees—and if either the husband or wife was from outside the village, that household would also have fields outside the village. However, nearly 80% of marriages were intravillage and villagers predominantly used fields located within the village limits regardless of the residence type, which helped maintain the cropping system. View Full-Text
Keywords: cropping system; land tenure; maternal clan; marriage system; sociocultural factors cropping system; land tenure; maternal clan; marriage system; sociocultural factors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yamane, Y.; Ito, K. Sociocultural Mechanisms Concerning Cropping Systems in Mountain Agriculture: A Case Study of the Eastern Slopes of Tanzania’s Uluguru Mountains. Agriculture 2020, 10, 377. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10090377

AMA Style

Yamane Y, Ito K. Sociocultural Mechanisms Concerning Cropping Systems in Mountain Agriculture: A Case Study of the Eastern Slopes of Tanzania’s Uluguru Mountains. Agriculture. 2020; 10(9):377. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10090377

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yamane, Yuko, and Kasumi Ito. 2020. "Sociocultural Mechanisms Concerning Cropping Systems in Mountain Agriculture: A Case Study of the Eastern Slopes of Tanzania’s Uluguru Mountains" Agriculture 10, no. 9: 377. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10090377

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