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Open AccessArticle

Self-Rated Health in Migrant and Non-Migrant Women before, during and after Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study of 0.5 Million Pregnancies from the Swedish Pregnancy Register

1
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden
3
Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, 752 37 Uppsala, Sweden
4
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden
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Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
6
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1764; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061764
Received: 6 May 2020 / Revised: 31 May 2020 / Accepted: 3 June 2020 / Published: 6 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Epidemiology & Public Health)
Self-rated health is a strong health marker. Migrants have been suggested to have poorer self-rated health than non-migrants (i.e., native-born). However, little is known about whether there are disparities in self-reported health in relation to pregnancy. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to examine the odds of poor self-rated health before, during and after pregnancy in migrant women as compared to women born in Sweden. We utilized population-based data from the Swedish Pregnancy Register containing 0.5 million women born in Sweden (i.e., non-migrant women) and migrant women between 2010 and 2018. Self-rated health was reported on a 5-point scale (from very poor to very good). Very poor and poor health were categorized as poor self-rated health. Logistic regression was utilized to calculate odds ratios (ORs) that were unadjusted and adjusted for covariates (age, parity, educational attainment and body mass index). The results demonstrate disparities in self-rated health across birth regions. In comparison to women born in Sweden, women born in Latin America and the Caribbean, South Asia as well as North Africa and the Middle East had consistently higher odds of poor self-rated health before, during and after pregnancy (ORs ranging from 1.14 to 1.96 in both unadjusted and adjusted models). Although women born in Sub-Saharan Africa did have comparable self-rated health as to women born in Sweden before pregnancy, after accounting for covariates, they had lower odds of poor self-rated health during and after pregnancy (ORs: 0.71 and 0.80 respectively). Therefore, additional measures and support may be needed to tackle disparities in health between migrant and non-migrant women before, during and after pregnancy. View Full-Text
Keywords: health inequalities; migration; pregnancy; self-rated health; self-reported health; self-perceived health health inequalities; migration; pregnancy; self-rated health; self-reported health; self-perceived health
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Henriksson, P.; Söderström, E.; Blomberg, M.; Nowicka, P.; Petersson, K.; Thomas, K.; Bendtsen, M.; Estévez-López, F.; Löf, M. Self-Rated Health in Migrant and Non-Migrant Women before, during and after Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study of 0.5 Million Pregnancies from the Swedish Pregnancy Register. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1764.

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