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Open AccessArticle

A Threshold of Objectively-Assessed Daily Sedentary Time for All-Cause Mortality in Older Adults: A Meta-Regression of Prospective Cohort Studies

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Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua City 500, Taiwan
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Department of Sports Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan
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Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
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Department of Health Promotion and Health Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan
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Department of Physical Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan. No.162, He-ping East Road, Section 1, Taipei 106, Taiwan
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Department of Exercise Health Science and Graduate Institute of Recreational Sport Management, National Taiwan University of Sport, Taiwan. No. 16, Section 1, Shuang-Shih Rd., Taichung 404, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 564; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040564
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 19 April 2019 / Published: 25 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Epidemiology & Public Health)
Background: This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the shape of the dose-response association between objectively-assessed daily sedentary time (ST) and all-cause mortality, and to explore whether there is a threshold of ST above which there is an increase in mortality risk in older adults. Methods: Searches for prospective cohort studies providing effect estimates of daily ST (exposure) on all-cause mortality (outcome) were undertaken in five databases up to 31 March 2019. A random-effects meta-regression model was conducted to quantify the dose-response relationship between daily ST and all-cause mortality. Sensitivity analyses were also performed to test the stability of the results. Results: Our analysis of pooled data from 11 eligible studies did not reveal a consistent shape of association between ST and mortality. After excluding three studies with potential confounding bias, there was a log-linear dose-response relationship between daily ST and all-cause mortality. Overall, higher amounts of time spent in sedentary behaviors were associated with elevated mortality risks in older adults. Visual assessments of dose-response relationships based on meta-regression analyses indicated that increased mortality risks became significant when total ST exceeded approximately 9 h/day. Conclusions: Based on a limited number of studies, this meta-analysis provides a starting point for considering a cut-off of daily sedentary time, suggesting older adults spend less time in daily sitting. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behavior; sitting; inactivity; review; cut-point; recommendation; meta-analysis sedentary behavior; sitting; inactivity; review; cut-point; recommendation; meta-analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ku, P.-W.; Steptoe, A.; Liao, Y.; Hsueh, M.-C.; Chen, L.-J. A Threshold of Objectively-Assessed Daily Sedentary Time for All-Cause Mortality in Older Adults: A Meta-Regression of Prospective Cohort Studies. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 564. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040564

AMA Style

Ku P-W, Steptoe A, Liao Y, Hsueh M-C, Chen L-J. A Threshold of Objectively-Assessed Daily Sedentary Time for All-Cause Mortality in Older Adults: A Meta-Regression of Prospective Cohort Studies. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(4):564. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040564

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ku, Po-Wen; Steptoe, Andrew; Liao, Yung; Hsueh, Ming-Chun; Chen, Li-Jung. 2019. "A Threshold of Objectively-Assessed Daily Sedentary Time for All-Cause Mortality in Older Adults: A Meta-Regression of Prospective Cohort Studies" J. Clin. Med. 8, no. 4: 564. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040564

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