Next Article in Journal
Renal Failure Impact on the Outcomes of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients Due to a Left Main Coronary Culprit Lesion Treated Using a Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Previous Article in Journal
Acid-Base Disturbances in Patients with Asthma: A Literature Review and Comments on Their Pathophysiology
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

A Threshold of Objectively-Assessed Daily Sedentary Time for All-Cause Mortality in Older Adults: A Meta-Regression of Prospective Cohort Studies

1
Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua City 500, Taiwan
2
Department of Sports Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan
3
Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
4
Department of Health Promotion and Health Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan
5
Department of Physical Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan. No.162, He-ping East Road, Section 1, Taipei 106, Taiwan
6
Department of Exercise Health Science and Graduate Institute of Recreational Sport Management, National Taiwan University of Sport, Taiwan. No. 16, Section 1, Shuang-Shih Rd., Taichung 404, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 564; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040564
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 19 April 2019 / Published: 25 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Epidemiology & Public Health)
  |  
PDF [1778 KB, uploaded 26 April 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Background: This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the shape of the dose-response association between objectively-assessed daily sedentary time (ST) and all-cause mortality, and to explore whether there is a threshold of ST above which there is an increase in mortality risk in older adults. Methods: Searches for prospective cohort studies providing effect estimates of daily ST (exposure) on all-cause mortality (outcome) were undertaken in five databases up to 31 March 2019. A random-effects meta-regression model was conducted to quantify the dose-response relationship between daily ST and all-cause mortality. Sensitivity analyses were also performed to test the stability of the results. Results: Our analysis of pooled data from 11 eligible studies did not reveal a consistent shape of association between ST and mortality. After excluding three studies with potential confounding bias, there was a log-linear dose-response relationship between daily ST and all-cause mortality. Overall, higher amounts of time spent in sedentary behaviors were associated with elevated mortality risks in older adults. Visual assessments of dose-response relationships based on meta-regression analyses indicated that increased mortality risks became significant when total ST exceeded approximately 9 h/day. Conclusions: Based on a limited number of studies, this meta-analysis provides a starting point for considering a cut-off of daily sedentary time, suggesting older adults spend less time in daily sitting. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behavior; sitting; inactivity; review; cut-point; recommendation; meta-analysis sedentary behavior; sitting; inactivity; review; cut-point; recommendation; meta-analysis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ku, P.-W.; Steptoe, A.; Liao, Y.; Hsueh, M.-C.; Chen, L.-J. A Threshold of Objectively-Assessed Daily Sedentary Time for All-Cause Mortality in Older Adults: A Meta-Regression of Prospective Cohort Studies. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 564.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top