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Open AccessArticle

Triple Network Resting State Connectivity Predicts Distress Tolerance and Is Associated with Cocaine Use

1
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA
2
Neuroimaging Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(12), 2135; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8122135
Received: 20 September 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 25 November 2019 / Published: 3 December 2019
Distress tolerance (DT), a predictor of substance use treatment retention and post-treatment relapse, is associated with task based neural activation in regions located within the salience (SN), default mode (DMN), and executive control networks (ECN). The impact of network connectivity on DT has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to test within and between network resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) associations with DT, and the impact of cocaine use on this relationship. Twenty-nine adults reporting regular cocaine use (CU) and 28 matched healthy control individuals (HC), underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging followed by the completion of two counterbalanced, computerized DT tasks. Dual-regression analysis was used to derive within and between network rsFC of the SN, DMN, and lateralized (left and right) ECN. Cox proportional-hazards survival models were used to test the interactive effect of rsFC and group on DT. The association between cocaine use severity, rsFC, and DT was tested within the CU group. Lower LECN and higher DMN-SN rsFC were associated with DT impairment. Greater amount of cocaine use per using day was associated with greater DMN-SN rsFC. The findings emphasize the role of neural resource allocation within the ECN and between DMN-SN on distress tolerance.
Keywords: distress tolerance; resting state functional connectivity; substance use disorder; cocaine; salience; default mode; executive control distress tolerance; resting state functional connectivity; substance use disorder; cocaine; salience; default mode; executive control
MDPI and ACS Style

Reese, E.D.; Yi, J.Y.; McKay, K.G.; Stein, E.A.; Ross, T.J.; Daughters, S.B. Triple Network Resting State Connectivity Predicts Distress Tolerance and Is Associated with Cocaine Use. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 2135.

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