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Correlation between Sleep Bruxism, Stress, and Depression—A Polysomnographic Study
Article

The Relationship between Sleep Bruxism and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Based on Polysomnographic Findings

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Department and Clinic of Internal Medicine, Occupational Diseases, Hypertension and Clinical Oncology, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
2
Department of Hygiene, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-345 Wroclaw, Poland
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Department and Clinic of Pulmonology and Lung Cancer, Wroclaw Medical University, 53-439 Wroclaw, Poland
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Department of Experimental Dentistry, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-425 Wroclaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(10), 1653; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101653
Received: 31 August 2019 / Revised: 30 September 2019 / Accepted: 7 October 2019 / Published: 11 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Bruxism—The Controversial Sleep Movement Activity)
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder. Sleep bruxism (SB) is a masticatory muscle activity during sleep that commonly co-occurs with OSA. The presented study aimed to assess this relationship and to identify factors affecting this co-occurrence. Adult patients (n = 110) were evaluated for OSA and SB in a sleep laboratory using polysomnography. The episodes of bruxism and respiratory events were scored according to the standards of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The prevalence of OSA and SB was found to be 86.37% and 50%, respectively. The bruxism episode index (BEI) was increased in the group with mild and moderate OSA (apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) <30) compared to that in the group with severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30) (5.50 ± 4.58 vs. 1.62 ± 1.28, p < 0.05). A positive correlation between AHI and BEI was observed in the group with AHI < 30. Regression analysis indicated that higher AHI, male gender, and diabetes were independent predictors for the increased BEI in group with AHI < 30. The relationship between OSA and SB depends on the degree of severity of OSA. OSA is correlated with SB in mild and moderate cases of OSA in the group of patients with increased risk of OSA. View Full-Text
Keywords: sleep bruxism; obstructive sleep apnea; polysomnography; diabetes sleep bruxism; obstructive sleep apnea; polysomnography; diabetes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Martynowicz, H.; Gac, P.; Brzecka, A.; Poreba, R.; Wojakowska, A.; Mazur, G.; Smardz, J.; Wieckiewicz, M. The Relationship between Sleep Bruxism and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Based on Polysomnographic Findings. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1653. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101653

AMA Style

Martynowicz H, Gac P, Brzecka A, Poreba R, Wojakowska A, Mazur G, Smardz J, Wieckiewicz M. The Relationship between Sleep Bruxism and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Based on Polysomnographic Findings. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(10):1653. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101653

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martynowicz, Helena, Pawel Gac, Anna Brzecka, Rafal Poreba, Anna Wojakowska, Grzegorz Mazur, Joanna Smardz, and Mieszko Wieckiewicz. 2019. "The Relationship between Sleep Bruxism and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Based on Polysomnographic Findings" Journal of Clinical Medicine 8, no. 10: 1653. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101653

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