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J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(9), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7090259

The Synergistic Effects of Orthokeratology and Atropine in Slowing the Progression of Myopia

1
School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
2
Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan
4
Research Center for Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
5
Children’s Hospital, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan
6
College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
7
Division of Chinese Medicine, Asia University Hospital, Taichung 413, Taiwan
8
Department of Pediatrics, Changhua Christian Children’s Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan
9
School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
10
Department of Ophthalmology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan
11
Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Ophthalmology)
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Abstract

Atropine and orthokeratology (OK) are both effective in slowing the progression of myopia. In the current study, we studied the combined effects of atropine and OK lenses on slowing the progression of myopia. This retrospective study included 84 patients who wore OK lenses and received atropine treatment (OA) and 95 patients who wore OK lenses alone (OK) for 2 years. We stratified patients into low (<6 D, LM) and high (≥6 D, HM) myopia groups, as well as two different atropine concentrations (0.125% and 0.025%). Significantly better LM control was observed in OA1 patients, compared with OK1 patients. Axial length was significantly shorter in the OA1 group (24.67 ± 1.53 mm) than in the OK1 group (24.9 ± 1.98 mm) (p = 0.042); similarly, it was shorter in the OA2 group (24.73 ± 1.53 mm) than in the OK2 group (25.01 ± 1.26 mm) (p = 0.031). For the HM patients, OA3 patients compared with OK3 patients, axial length was significantly shorter in the OA3 group (25.78 ± 1.46 mm) than in the OK3 group (25.93 ± 1.94 mm) (p = 0.021); similarly, it was shorter in the OA4 patients (25.86 ± 1.21 mm) than in the OK4 patients (26.05 ± 1.57 mm) (p = 0.011). Combined treatment with atropine and OK lenses would be a choice of treatment to control the development of myopia. View Full-Text
Keywords: myopia; orthokeratology; atropine myopia; orthokeratology; atropine
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Wan, L.; Wei, C.-C.; Chen, C.S.; Chang, C.-Y.; Lin, C.-J.; Chen, J.J.-Y.; Tien, P.-T.; Lin, H.-J. The Synergistic Effects of Orthokeratology and Atropine in Slowing the Progression of Myopia. J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7, 259.

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