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J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(5), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7050089

Perceived Discrimination and Binge Eating Disorder; Gender Difference in African Americans

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA
2
Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA
Received: 10 March 2018 / Revised: 7 April 2018 / Accepted: 9 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosomatic Medicine)
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PDF [309 KB, uploaded 3 May 2018]

Abstract

Environmental stressors, such as perceived discrimination (PD), are linked to Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The current study investigated the association between PD and BED among African Americans, and the variation in such an association based on gender. Data of the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), 2001–2003, with a nationally-representative sample of African American adults, were used (n = 3516). The independent variable in the study was PD. The dependent variable was BED, measured using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Socio-demographics (age, education, employment, and marital status) were covariates, and gender was the moderator variable. Survey logistic regressions with and without gender × PD interaction terms were used for data analysis. In the pooled sample, PD was associated with higher odds of BED, net of socio-demographic factors. Models also showed a significant gender × PD interaction term suggesting a stronger association between PD and BED for women, compared to men. Gender specific models showed an association between PD and BED among female, but not male, African Americans. Although a link may exist between PD and BED among African Americans, the magnitude of this association depends on gender, with a stronger association among females than males. This finding is in line with the literature that has shown gender-specific consequences of environmental stress for African Americans. View Full-Text
Keywords: perceived discrimination; Binge Eating Disorder; race; gender perceived discrimination; Binge Eating Disorder; race; gender
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Assari, S. Perceived Discrimination and Binge Eating Disorder; Gender Difference in African Americans. J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7, 89.

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