Next Article in Journal
Post-Exertional Malaise May Be Related to Central Blood Pressure, Sympathetic Activity and Mental Fatigue in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients
Previous Article in Journal
Day-Time Declamping Is Associated with Better Outcomes in Kidney Transplantation: The Circarein Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Physical Exercise Moderates the Effects of Disability on Depression in People with Multiple Sclerosis during the COVID-19 Outbreak
Review

Digital Technology in Clinical Trials for Multiple Sclerosis: Systematic Review

1
Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Centre, Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and Odontostomatology, Federico II University of Naples, 80138 Naples, Italy
2
Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 81100 Naples, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Philipp Albrecht
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(11), 2328; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112328
Received: 27 February 2021 / Revised: 12 May 2021 / Accepted: 21 May 2021 / Published: 26 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Multiple Sclerosis)
Clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS) have been including digital technology tools to overcome limitations in treatment delivery and disease monitoring. In March 2020, we conducted a systematic search on pubmed.gov and clinicaltrials.gov databases (with no restrictions) to identify all relevant published and unpublished clinical trials, in English language, including MS patients, in which digital technology was applied. We used “multiple sclerosis” and “clinical trial” as the main search words, and “app”, “digital”, “electronic”, “internet” and “mobile” as additional search words, separately. Digital technology is part of clinical trial interventions to deliver psychotherapy and motor rehabilitation, with exergames, e-training, and robot-assisted exercises. Digital technology has been used to standardise previously existing outcome measures, with automatic acquisitions, reduced inconsistencies, and improved detection of symptoms (e.g., electronic recording of motor performance). Other clinical trials have been using digital technology for monitoring symptoms that would be otherwise difficult to detect (e.g., fatigue, balance), for measuring treatment adherence and side effects, and for self-assessment purposes. Collection of outcome measures is progressively shifting from paper-based on site, to internet-based on site, and, in the future, to internet-based at home, with the detection of clinical and treatment features that would have remained otherwise invisible. Similarly, remote interventions provide new possibilities of motor and cognitive rehabilitation. View Full-Text
Keywords: multiple sclerosis; clinical trial; digital technology; outcome measures multiple sclerosis; clinical trial; digital technology; outcome measures
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

De Angelis, M.; Lavorgna, L.; Carotenuto, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Lanzillo, R.; Brescia Morra, V.; Moccia, M. Digital Technology in Clinical Trials for Multiple Sclerosis: Systematic Review. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2328. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112328

AMA Style

De Angelis M, Lavorgna L, Carotenuto A, Petruzzo M, Lanzillo R, Brescia Morra V, Moccia M. Digital Technology in Clinical Trials for Multiple Sclerosis: Systematic Review. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(11):2328. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112328

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Angelis, Marcello, Luigi Lavorgna, Antonio Carotenuto, Martina Petruzzo, Roberta Lanzillo, Vincenzo Brescia Morra, and Marcello Moccia. 2021. "Digital Technology in Clinical Trials for Multiple Sclerosis: Systematic Review" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 11: 2328. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112328

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop