Next Article in Journal
The Role of Emotional Competences in Parents’ Vaccine Hesitancy
Next Article in Special Issue
Demand Creation for COVID-19 Vaccination: Overcoming Vaccine Hesitancy through Social Marketing
Previous Article in Journal
Zika Virus Pathogenesis: A Battle for Immune Evasion
Previous Article in Special Issue
Italian Adults’ Likelihood of Getting COVID-19 Vaccine: A Second Online Survey
Article

Measurement Invariance of the Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale: Comparison between Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese-Speaking Populations

1
Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701401, Taiwan
2
Department of Occupational Therapy, Shu-Zen Junior College of Medicine and Management, Kaohsiung 82144, Taiwan
3
School of Education Science, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000, China
4
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health & Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong
5
Department of Nursing, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701401, Taiwan
6
International Doctoral Program in Nursing, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701401, Taiwan
7
Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701401, Taiwan
8
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701401, Taiwan
9
Department of Occupational Therapy, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 824005, Taiwan
10
Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital & School of Medicine College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807378, Taiwan
11
Department of Public Health, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701401, Taiwan
12
International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG14FQ, UK
13
Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, 55318 Jönköping, Sweden
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ralph J. DiClemente
Vaccines 2021, 9(3), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030297
Received: 6 March 2021 / Revised: 17 March 2021 / Accepted: 17 March 2021 / Published: 22 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccination and Public Health Version II: COVID-19 Vaccination)
The impacts of novel coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) on human life continue to be serious. To control the spread of COVID-19, the production of effective vaccines is likely to be one of the best solutions. However, vaccination hesitancy may decrease individuals’ willingness to get vaccinated. The Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale (DrVac-COVID19S) was recently developed to help healthcare professionals and researchers better understand vaccination acceptance. The present study examined whether DrVac-COVID19S is measurement invariant across different subgroups (Taiwanese vs. mainland Chinese university students; males vs. females; and health-related program majors vs. non-health-related program majors). Taiwanese (n = 761; mean age = 25.51 years; standard deviation (SD) = 6.42; 63.5% females) and mainland Chinese university students (n = 3145; mean age = 20.72 years; SD = 2.06; 50.2% females) were recruited using an online survey between 5 January and 21 February 2021. Factor structure and measurement invariance of the two DrVac-COVID19S scales (nine-item and 12-item) were tested using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The findings indicated that the DrVac-COVID19S had a four-factor structure and was measurement invariant across the subgroups. The DrVac-COVID19S’s four-factor structure was supported by the CFA results is a practical and valid instrument to quickly capture university students’ willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination. Moreover, the DrVac-COVID19S can be used to compare university students’ underlying reasons to get COVID-19 vaccination among different subgroups. View Full-Text
Keywords: confirmatory factor analysis; COVID-19; measurement invariance; vaccine; university students; Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale confirmatory factor analysis; COVID-19; measurement invariance; vaccine; university students; Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yeh, Y.-C.; Chen, I.-H.; Ahorsu, D.K.; Ko, N.-Y.; Chen, K.-L.; Li, P.-C.; Yen, C.-F.; Lin, C.-Y.; Griffiths, M.D.; Pakpour, A.H. Measurement Invariance of the Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale: Comparison between Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese-Speaking Populations. Vaccines 2021, 9, 297. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030297

AMA Style

Yeh Y-C, Chen I-H, Ahorsu DK, Ko N-Y, Chen K-L, Li P-C, Yen C-F, Lin C-Y, Griffiths MD, Pakpour AH. Measurement Invariance of the Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale: Comparison between Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese-Speaking Populations. Vaccines. 2021; 9(3):297. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030297

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yeh, Ya-Chin; Chen, I-Hua; Ahorsu, Daniel K.; Ko, Nai-Ying; Chen, Kuan-Lin; Li, Ping-Chia; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Lin, Chung-Ying; Griffiths, Mark D.; Pakpour, Amir H. 2021. "Measurement Invariance of the Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale: Comparison between Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese-Speaking Populations" Vaccines 9, no. 3: 297. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030297

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop