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Article

Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States

1
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2
Department of Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(4), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582
Received: 13 September 2020 / Revised: 28 September 2020 / Accepted: 28 September 2020 / Published: 3 October 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage the world, with the United States being highly affected. A vaccine provides the best hope for a permanent solution to controlling the pandemic. However, to be effective, a vaccine must be accepted and used by a large majority of the population. The aim of this study was to understand the attitudes towards and obstacles facing vaccination with a potential COVID-19 vaccine. To measure these attitudes a survey was administered to 316 respondents across the United States by a survey corporation. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the relationships of several factors with attitudes toward potential COVID-19 vaccination. Prior vaccine usage and attitudes predicted attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination. Assessment of the severity of COVID-19 for the United States was also predictive. Approximately 68% of all respondents were supportive of being vaccinated for COVID-19, but side effects, efficacy and length of testing remained concerns. Longer testing, increased efficacy and development in the United States were significantly associated with increased vaccine acceptance. Messages promoting COVID-19 vaccination should seek to alleviate the concerns of those who are already vaccine-hesitant. Messaging directed at the benefits of vaccination for the United States as a country would address the second predictive factor. Enough time should be taken to allay concerns about both short- and long-term side effects before a vaccine is released. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; vaccine hesitancy; vaccine attitudes; vaccine development; SARS-CoV-2 COVID-19; vaccine hesitancy; vaccine attitudes; vaccine development; SARS-CoV-2
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pogue, K.; Jensen, J.L.; Stancil, C.K.; Ferguson, D.G.; Hughes, S.J.; Mello, E.J.; Burgess, R.; Berges, B.K.; Quaye, A.; Poole, B.D. Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States. Vaccines 2020, 8, 582. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582

AMA Style

Pogue K, Jensen JL, Stancil CK, Ferguson DG, Hughes SJ, Mello EJ, Burgess R, Berges BK, Quaye A, Poole BD. Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States. Vaccines. 2020; 8(4):582. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pogue, Kendall, Jamie L. Jensen, Carter K. Stancil, Daniel G. Ferguson, Savannah J. Hughes, Emily J. Mello, Ryan Burgess, Bradford K. Berges, Abraham Quaye, and Brian D. Poole. 2020. "Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States" Vaccines 8, no. 4: 582. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582

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