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Open AccessArticle

Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States

1
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2
Department of Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(4), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582
Received: 13 September 2020 / Revised: 28 September 2020 / Accepted: 28 September 2020 / Published: 3 October 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage the world, with the United States being highly affected. A vaccine provides the best hope for a permanent solution to controlling the pandemic. However, to be effective, a vaccine must be accepted and used by a large majority of the population. The aim of this study was to understand the attitudes towards and obstacles facing vaccination with a potential COVID-19 vaccine. To measure these attitudes a survey was administered to 316 respondents across the United States by a survey corporation. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the relationships of several factors with attitudes toward potential COVID-19 vaccination. Prior vaccine usage and attitudes predicted attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination. Assessment of the severity of COVID-19 for the United States was also predictive. Approximately 68% of all respondents were supportive of being vaccinated for COVID-19, but side effects, efficacy and length of testing remained concerns. Longer testing, increased efficacy and development in the United States were significantly associated with increased vaccine acceptance. Messages promoting COVID-19 vaccination should seek to alleviate the concerns of those who are already vaccine-hesitant. Messaging directed at the benefits of vaccination for the United States as a country would address the second predictive factor. Enough time should be taken to allay concerns about both short- and long-term side effects before a vaccine is released. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; vaccine hesitancy; vaccine attitudes; vaccine development; SARS-CoV-2 COVID-19; vaccine hesitancy; vaccine attitudes; vaccine development; SARS-CoV-2
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pogue, K.; Jensen, J.L.; Stancil, C.K.; Ferguson, D.G.; Hughes, S.J.; Mello, E.J.; Burgess, R.; Berges, B.K.; Quaye, A.; Poole, B.D. Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States. Vaccines 2020, 8, 582. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582

AMA Style

Pogue K, Jensen JL, Stancil CK, Ferguson DG, Hughes SJ, Mello EJ, Burgess R, Berges BK, Quaye A, Poole BD. Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States. Vaccines. 2020; 8(4):582. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pogue, Kendall; Jensen, Jamie L.; Stancil, Carter K.; Ferguson, Daniel G.; Hughes, Savannah J.; Mello, Emily J.; Burgess, Ryan; Berges, Bradford K.; Quaye, Abraham; Poole, Brian D. 2020. "Influences on Attitudes Regarding Potential COVID-19 Vaccination in the United States" Vaccines 8, no. 4: 582. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040582

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