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Open AccessArticle

Seroprevalence to Measles Virus after Vaccination or Natural Infection in an Adult Population, in Italy

1
Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Santa Maria delle Scotte Hospital, V.le Bracci, 1 53100 Siena, Italy
2
Preventive Medicine and Health Surveillance Unit, Santa Maria delle Scotte Hospital, V.le Bracci, 1 53100 Siena, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(1), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8010066
Received: 23 December 2019 / Revised: 26 January 2020 / Accepted: 31 January 2020 / Published: 3 February 2020
An increase in measles cases worldwide, with outbreaks, has been registered in the last few years, despite the availability of a safe and highly efficacious vaccine. In addition to an inadequate vaccination coverage, even in high-income European countries studies proved that some vaccinated people were also found seronegative years after vaccination, thus increasing the number of people susceptible to measles infection. In this study, we evaluated the immunization status and the seroprevalence of measles antibodies among 1092 healthy adults, either vaccinated or naturally infected, in order to investigate the persistence of anti-measles IgG. Among subjects who received two doses of measles vaccine, the neutralizing antibody titer tended to decline over time. In addition, data collected from a neutralization assay performed on 110 healthy vaccinated subjects suggested an inverse correlation between neutralizing antibody titers and the time elapsed between the two vaccinations, with a significant decline in the neutralizing titer when the interval between the two doses was ≥11 years. On the basis of these results, monitoring the serological status of the population 10–12 years after vaccination could be important both to limit the number of people who are potentially susceptible to measles, despite the high efficacy of MMR vaccine, and to recommend a booster vaccine for the seronegatives. View Full-Text
Keywords: measles virus; vaccine; neutralizing antibodies; seroprevalence measles virus; vaccine; neutralizing antibodies; seroprevalence
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Anichini, G.; Gandolfo, C.; Fabrizi, S.; Miceli, G.B.; Terrosi, C.; Gori Savellini, G.; Prathyumnan, S.; Orsi, D.; Battista, G.; Cusi, M.G. Seroprevalence to Measles Virus after Vaccination or Natural Infection in an Adult Population, in Italy. Vaccines 2020, 8, 66.

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