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Vitamin C and E Treatment Blunts Sprint Interval Training–Induced Changes in Inflammatory Mediator-, Calcium-, and Mitochondria-Related Signaling in Recreationally Active Elderly Humans

1
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Institute of Sport Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, 44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
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Clinic of Surgery, Republican Hospital of Kaunas, 44249 Kaunas, Lithuania
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Institute of Sport Sciences and Physiotherapy, University of Tartu, 50090 Tartu, Estonia
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Laboratory of Functional Morphology, University of Tartu, 50090 Tartu, Estonia
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Department of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Tartu University Hospital, 50090 Tartu, Estonia
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Laboratory of Kinanthropometry; University of Tartu, 50090 Tartu, Estonia
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Food and Nutrition Department of Health Professions, Faculty of Health, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GF, UK
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Institute of Sports Sciences, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
10
Cardiology Unit, Heart, Vascular and Neurology Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(9), 879; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090879
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 24 August 2020 / Accepted: 14 September 2020 / Published: 17 September 2020
Sprint interval training (SIT) has emerged as a time-efficient training regimen for young individuals. Here, we studied whether SIT is effective also in elderly individuals and whether the training response was affected by treatment with the antioxidants vitamin C and E. Recreationally active elderly (mean age 65) men received either vitamin C (1 g/day) and vitamin E (235 mg/day) or placebo. Training consisted of nine SIT sessions (three sessions/week for three weeks of 4-6 repetitions of 30-s all-out cycling sprints) interposed by 4 min rest. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were taken before, 1 h after, and 24 h after the first and last SIT sessions. At the end of the three weeks of training, SIT-induced changes in relative mRNA expression of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)- and mitochondria-related proteins, inflammatory mediators, and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channel, the ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1), were blunted in the vitamin treated group. Western blots frequently showed a major (>50%) decrease in the full-length expression of RyR1 24 h after SIT sessions; in the trained state, vitamin treatment seemed to provide protection against this severe RyR1 modification. Power at exhaustion during an incremental cycling test was increased by ~5% at the end of the training period, whereas maximal oxygen uptake remained unchanged; vitamin treatment did not affect these measures. In conclusion, treatment with the antioxidants vitamin C and E blunts SIT-induced cellular signaling in skeletal muscle of elderly individuals, while the present training regimen was too short or too intense for the changes in signaling to be translated into a clear-cut change in physical performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: sprint interval training; high-intensity interval training; aging; endurance exercise; skeletal muscle; antioxidant treatment; reactive oxygen/nitrogen species; calcium; inflammatory mediators sprint interval training; high-intensity interval training; aging; endurance exercise; skeletal muscle; antioxidant treatment; reactive oxygen/nitrogen species; calcium; inflammatory mediators
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wyckelsma, V.L.; Venckunas, T.; Brazaitis, M.; Gastaldello, S.; Snieckus, A.; Eimantas, N.; Baranauskiene, N.; Subocius, A.; Skurvydas, A.; Pääsuke, M.; Gapeyeva, H.; Kaasik, P.; Pääsuke, R.; Jürimäe, J.; Graf, B.A.; Kayser, B.; Place, N.; Andersson, D.C.; Kamandulis, S.; Westerblad, H. Vitamin C and E Treatment Blunts Sprint Interval Training–Induced Changes in Inflammatory Mediator-, Calcium-, and Mitochondria-Related Signaling in Recreationally Active Elderly Humans. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 879. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090879

AMA Style

Wyckelsma VL, Venckunas T, Brazaitis M, Gastaldello S, Snieckus A, Eimantas N, Baranauskiene N, Subocius A, Skurvydas A, Pääsuke M, Gapeyeva H, Kaasik P, Pääsuke R, Jürimäe J, Graf BA, Kayser B, Place N, Andersson DC, Kamandulis S, Westerblad H. Vitamin C and E Treatment Blunts Sprint Interval Training–Induced Changes in Inflammatory Mediator-, Calcium-, and Mitochondria-Related Signaling in Recreationally Active Elderly Humans. Antioxidants. 2020; 9(9):879. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090879

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wyckelsma, Victoria L., Tomas Venckunas, Marius Brazaitis, Stefano Gastaldello, Audrius Snieckus, Nerijus Eimantas, Neringa Baranauskiene, Andrejus Subocius, Albertas Skurvydas, Mati Pääsuke, Helena Gapeyeva, Priit Kaasik, Reedik Pääsuke, Jaak Jürimäe, Brigitte A. Graf, Bengt Kayser, Nicolas Place, Daniel C. Andersson, Sigitas Kamandulis, and Håkan Westerblad. 2020. "Vitamin C and E Treatment Blunts Sprint Interval Training–Induced Changes in Inflammatory Mediator-, Calcium-, and Mitochondria-Related Signaling in Recreationally Active Elderly Humans" Antioxidants 9, no. 9: 879. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090879

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