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Review

Ellagic Acid as a Tool to Limit the Diabetes Burden: Updated Evidence

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Endocrinology and Nutrition Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
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Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de la Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), 28029 Madrid, Spain
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Renal and Vascular Inflammation Lab, Health Research Institute-Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD), Autonoma University of Madrid (UAM), 28040 Madrid, Spain
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Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), 28029 Madrid, Spain
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Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS), 08036 Barcelona, Spain
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IMIM—Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, 08003 Barcelona, Spain
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Barcelonaβeta Brain Research Center, Pasqual Maragall Foundation, 08005 Barcelona, Spain
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(12), 1226; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121226
Received: 12 November 2020 / Revised: 29 November 2020 / Accepted: 2 December 2020 / Published: 3 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Aging and Associated Chronic Diseases)
Oxidative stress contributes not only to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) but also to diabetic vascular complications. It follows that antioxidants might contribute to limiting the diabetes burden. In this review we focus on ellagic acid (EA), a compound that can be obtained upon intestinal hydrolysis of dietary ellagitannins, a family of polyphenols naturally found in several fruits and seeds. There is increasing research on cardiometabolic effects of ellagitannins, EA, and urolithins (EA metabolites). We updated research conducted on these compounds and (I) glucose metabolism; (II) inflammation, oxidation, and glycation; and (III) diabetic complications. We included studies testing EA in isolation, extracts or preparations enriched in EA, or EA-rich foods (mostly pomegranate juice). Animal research on the topic, entirely conducted in murine models, mostly reported glucose-lowering, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-glycation effects, along with prevention of micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications. Clinical research is incipient and mostly involved non-randomized and low-powered studies, which confirmed the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of EA-rich foods, but without conclusive results on glucose control. Overall, EA-related compounds might be potential agents to limit the diabetes burden, but well-designed human randomized controlled trials are needed to fill the existing gap between experimental and clinical research. View Full-Text
Keywords: ellagic acid; type 2 diabetes; glucose metabolism; oxidative stress; inflammation; diabetic complications ellagic acid; type 2 diabetes; glucose metabolism; oxidative stress; inflammation; diabetic complications
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MDPI and ACS Style

Amor, A.J.; Gómez-Guerrero, C.; Ortega, E.; Sala-Vila, A.; Lázaro, I. Ellagic Acid as a Tool to Limit the Diabetes Burden: Updated Evidence. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 1226. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121226

AMA Style

Amor AJ, Gómez-Guerrero C, Ortega E, Sala-Vila A, Lázaro I. Ellagic Acid as a Tool to Limit the Diabetes Burden: Updated Evidence. Antioxidants. 2020; 9(12):1226. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121226

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amor, Antonio J., Carmen Gómez-Guerrero, Emilio Ortega, Aleix Sala-Vila, and Iolanda Lázaro. 2020. "Ellagic Acid as a Tool to Limit the Diabetes Burden: Updated Evidence" Antioxidants 9, no. 12: 1226. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121226

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