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Linking What We Eat to Our Mood: A Review of Diet, Dietary Antioxidants, and Depression

by Qingyi Huang 1,2,3, Huan Liu 1,2, Katsuhiko Suzuki 4, Sihui Ma 3,* and Chunhong Liu 1,2,*
1
College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
2
The Key Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510642, China
3
Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa 359-1192, Japan
4
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa 359-1192, Japan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090376
Received: 9 July 2019 / Revised: 26 August 2019 / Accepted: 31 August 2019 / Published: 5 September 2019
Studies have shown that diet and nutrition play significant roles in the prevention of depression and its clinical treatment. The present review aims to provide a clear understanding of the associations between diet patterns, specific foods, nutrients such as antioxidants, and depression. As a result, balanced dietary patterns such as the Mediterranean diet and certain foods such as fish, fresh vegetables, and fruits have been associated with a lower risk of depression or depressive symptoms, while high-fat Western diets and sugar-sweetened beverages have been associated with higher risk of depression or depressive symptoms. Dietary antioxidants such as green tea polyphenols or isoflavonoid intake have been negatively associated with depression or depressive symptoms. It is concluded that diet patterns, specific foods, and antioxidants play important roles in the prevention and clinical treatment of depression. View Full-Text
Keywords: depression; food; dietary pattern; nutrition; oxidative stress; inflammation; cytokine depression; food; dietary pattern; nutrition; oxidative stress; inflammation; cytokine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, Q.; Liu, H.; Suzuki, K.; Ma, S.; Liu, C. Linking What We Eat to Our Mood: A Review of Diet, Dietary Antioxidants, and Depression. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 376.

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