Next Article in Journal
Kombucha Tea—A Double Power of Bioactive Compounds from Tea and Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeasts (SCOBY)
Next Article in Special Issue
Biochemical Evaluation of the Effects of Hydroxyurea in Vitro on Red Blood Cells
Previous Article in Journal
BACE1 Inhibition Increases Susceptibility to Oxidative Stress by Promoting Mitochondrial Damage
Previous Article in Special Issue
Verbascoside Protects Gingival Cells against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress via PKC/HMGB1/RAGE/NFκB Pathway
Article

Salivary Oxidative Stress Markers’ Relation to Oral Diseases in Children and Adolescents

1
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan 4513956184, Iran
2
Pardis Health Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1985717443, Iran
3
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115 Iasi, Romania
4
Department of Epidemiology, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan 4513956184, Iran
5
School of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1417614411, Iran
6
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115 Iasi, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Soliman Khatib and Dana Atrahimovich Blatt
Antioxidants 2021, 10(10), 1540; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10101540
Received: 28 August 2021 / Revised: 22 September 2021 / Accepted: 24 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative-Stress in Human Diseases)
Current evidence suggests that salivary markers of oxidative stress are indicative of clinical disease indices such as the papillary bleeding index (PBI) and the caries index (CI). The aim of this study was to assess the relation of oxidative stress markers with oral dental caries and periodontal problems in a pediatric population. In our case-control study, unstimulated whole saliva was collected from individuals aged 3–18 years (n = 177); 14 individuals were excluded. Study subjects were divided into those with caries (CI = 2, n = 78) and those who were caries-free (n = 85). These groups were then divided into another subset consisting of children (mean age 7.3 years, n = 121) and adolescents (mean age 16.1 years, n = 42). The PBI was determined in all groups. We then assessed salivary levels of oxidative stress markers. Our results showed that, the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) level increased in patients with more gingival bleeding (p < 0.05) in the study group aged 3–18 years. In addition, TAC showed a significant decrease in samples with caries when compared to the caries-free group in adolescents (p = 0.008). In conclusion, TAC levels may be a marker of both gingival bleeding and dental caries in young adult populations. We hope that in the near future, prophylaxis, control, follow up and even possible therapeutic use of oxidative stress markers in a chairside way will become possible as antioxidants have been shown to be effective against oral diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxidative stress; dental caries; saliva; periodontal diseases; child dentistry oxidative stress; dental caries; saliva; periodontal diseases; child dentistry
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Salman, B.N.; Darvish, S.; Goriuc, A.; Mazloomzadeh, S.; Hossein Poor Tehrani, M.; Luchian, I. Salivary Oxidative Stress Markers’ Relation to Oral Diseases in Children and Adolescents. Antioxidants 2021, 10, 1540. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10101540

AMA Style

Salman BN, Darvish S, Goriuc A, Mazloomzadeh S, Hossein Poor Tehrani M, Luchian I. Salivary Oxidative Stress Markers’ Relation to Oral Diseases in Children and Adolescents. Antioxidants. 2021; 10(10):1540. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10101540

Chicago/Turabian Style

Salman, Bahareh N., Shayan Darvish, Ancuta Goriuc, Saeideh Mazloomzadeh, Maryam Hossein Poor Tehrani, and Ionut Luchian. 2021. "Salivary Oxidative Stress Markers’ Relation to Oral Diseases in Children and Adolescents" Antioxidants 10, no. 10: 1540. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10101540

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop