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The Impact of Ethologically Relevant Stressors on Adult Mammalian Neurogenesis

Behavioral Science Department, Utah Valley University, Orem, UT 84057, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(7), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9070158
Received: 11 June 2019 / Revised: 30 June 2019 / Accepted: 2 July 2019 / Published: 4 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adult Neurogenesis and Neurological Disorders)
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Abstract

Adult neurogenesis—the formation and functional integration of adult-generated neurons—remains a hot neuroscience topic. Decades of research have identified numerous endogenous (such as neurotransmitters and hormones) and exogenous (such as environmental enrichment and exercise) factors that regulate the various neurogenic stages. Stress, an exogenous factor, has received a lot of attention. Despite the large number of reviews discussing the impact of stress on adult neurogenesis, no systematic review on ethologically relevant stressors exists to date. The current review details the effects of conspecifically-induced psychosocial stress (specifically looking at the lack or disruption of social interactions and confrontation) as well as non-conspecifically-induced stress on mammalian adult neurogenesis. The underlying mechanisms, as well as the possible functional role of the altered neurogenesis level, are also discussed. The reviewed data suggest that ethologically relevant stressors reduce adult neurogenesis. View Full-Text
Keywords: adult neurogenesis; social stress; social isolation; social defeat; dominance hierarchy adult neurogenesis; social stress; social isolation; social defeat; dominance hierarchy
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Jorgensen, C.; Taylor, J.; Barton, T. The Impact of Ethologically Relevant Stressors on Adult Mammalian Neurogenesis. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 158.

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