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Article

Psychiatric Disorders and Alcohol Consumption Among Low-Income African Americans:Gender Differences

by 1,† and 2,*,†
1
School of Nursing, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
2
Department of Family Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(4), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9040086
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 15 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
Background: Although cooccurrence of nonsubstance use disorders (non-SUDs) and substance use is well-established in the literature, most of what we know in this regard is derived from studies that have recruited predominantly White sample populations. As a result, there is a gap in knowledge on this link among low-income African Americans (AAs). There is also a need to understand how low-income AA men and women differ in these associations. Objective: To study whether there is an association between number of non-SUDs and amount of alcohol consumption by AA adults, and whether this association varies between AA men and women. Methods: This cross-sectional study recruited a nonrandom sample of 150 AA adults with non-SUDs (i.e., major depression, bipolar disorders, obsessive–compulsive disorder, paranoid disorder, panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and schizoaffective disorder). The independent variable was the number of non-SUDs. The dependent variable was the amount of alcohol consumption. Age, socioeconomic status (educational attainment and household income), and self-rated health were covariates. Gender was the moderator. Linear regression models were used to analyze the data. Results: A higher number of non-SUDs was not associated with a higher amount of alcohol use in the pooled sample of AA adults. We, however, found a significant interaction between gender and number of non-SUDs on the amount of alcohol use, suggesting a stronger effect of non-SUDs on alcohol consumption in AA men than in AA women. Gender-stratified linear regression models showed a positive association between number of non-SUDs and amount of alcohol consumption in AA men but not in AA women. Conclusion: Non-SUDs impact alcohol use of AA men but not women. Future research should test whether AA men may have a higher tendency to turn to alcohol to regulate their emotions and cope with psychological pain due to multiple non-SUDs. The results also suggest that integration of services for SUDs and non-SUDs may be more relevant to provision of mental health services for AA men than AA women. View Full-Text
Keywords: race; gender; Blacks; African Americans; ethnic groups; psychiatric disorders; alcohol use race; gender; Blacks; African Americans; ethnic groups; psychiatric disorders; alcohol use
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cobb, S.; Assari, S. Psychiatric Disorders and Alcohol Consumption Among Low-Income African Americans:Gender Differences. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 86. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9040086

AMA Style

Cobb S, Assari S. Psychiatric Disorders and Alcohol Consumption Among Low-Income African Americans:Gender Differences. Brain Sciences. 2019; 9(4):86. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9040086

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cobb, Sharon, and Shervin Assari. 2019. "Psychiatric Disorders and Alcohol Consumption Among Low-Income African Americans:Gender Differences" Brain Sciences 9, no. 4: 86. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9040086

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