Next Article in Journal
Brain–Computer Interfaces for Human Augmentation
Previous Article in Journal
Victims of War: Dehydroepiandrosterone Concentrations in Hair and Their Associations with Trauma Sequelae in Palestinian Adolescents Living in the West Bank
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sustained Opening of the Blood-Brain Barrier with Progressive Accumulation of White Matter Hyperintensities Following Ischemic Stroke
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview

Blood Pressure Gradients in the Brain: Their Importance to Understanding Pathogenesis of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

Stroke Prevention & Atherosclerosis Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, Western University, 1400 Western Road, London, ON N6G 2V4, Canada
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9020021
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
  |  
PDF [2699 KB, uploaded 29 January 2019]
  |     |  

Abstract

The term “lacunar infarction” referred to small infarctions in the basal ganglia, internal capsule, thalamus, and brainstem, due to hypertensive small vessel disease. However, it has become common to refer to all small infarctions as lacunar. It is important to understand that true lacunes occur in a phylogenetically ancient part of the brain, the “vascular centrencephalon”, where short straight arteries with few branches transmit high blood pressure straight through to end-arterioles. The cortex is supplied by long arteries with many branches, so there is a very large blood pressure gradient in the brain. When blood pressure in the brachial artery is 117/75 mmHg, the pressure in the lenticulostriate artery would be 113/73, and the pressure in small parietal arterioles would be only 59/38 mmHg. Recent studies have reported that patients with a pulse pressure >60 mmHg and diastolic pressure <60 mmHg have a doubling of coronary risk and a 5.85-fold increase in stroke risk. This means that new low systolic targets being proposed will probably decrease the incidence of true lacunes, but increase small subcortical infarctions in the hemispheres. The pathogenesis of small vessel disease should be interpreted in the light of these blood pressure gradients. View Full-Text
Keywords: Small vessel disease; lacunar infarction; hypertension; cerebral autoregulation; blood pressure gradients; vascular centrencephalon Small vessel disease; lacunar infarction; hypertension; cerebral autoregulation; blood pressure gradients; vascular centrencephalon
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Spence, J.D. Blood Pressure Gradients in the Brain: Their Importance to Understanding Pathogenesis of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 21.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Brain Sci. EISSN 2076-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top