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Open AccessArticle

From e-Health to i-Health: Prospective Reflexions on the Use of Intelligent Systems in Mental Health Care

1
Centre de Recherche Médecine, Sciences, Santé, Santé Mentale, Société (CERMES3), UMR CNRS 8211-Unité Inserm 988-EHESS-Université Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France
2
FondaMental Foundation, 94000 Créteil, France
3
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1061 Neuropsychiatry: Epidemiological and Clinical Research, University of Montpellier, 34000 Montpellier, France
4
Department of Psychiatric Emergency & Acute Care, Lapeyronie Hospital, CHU Montpellier, 34000 Montpellier, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(6), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8060098
Received: 25 April 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 28 May 2018 / Published: 31 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression)
Depressive disorders cover a set of disabling problems, often chronic or recurrent. They are characterized by a high level of psychiatric and somatic comorbidities and represent an important public health problem. To date, therapeutic solutions remain unsatisfactory. For some researchers, this is a sign of decisive paradigmatic failure due to the way in which disorders are conceptualized. They hypothesize that the symptoms of a categorical disorder, or of different comorbid disorders, can be interwoven in chains of interdependencies on different elements, of which it would be possible to act independently and synergistically to influence the functioning of the symptom system, rather than limiting oneself to targeting a hypothetical single underlying cause. New connected technologies make it possible to invent new observation and intervention tools allowing better phenotypic characterization of disorders and their evolution, that fit particularly well into this new “symptoms network” paradigm. Synergies are possible and desirable between these technological and epistemological innovations and can possibly help to solve some of the difficult problems people with mental disorders face in their everyday life, as we will show through a fictional case study exploring the possibilities of connected technologies in mental disorders in the near future. View Full-Text
Keywords: m-health; i-health; depression; nosography; categorizations; symptoms networks; ecological momentary assessment; ecological momentary intervention; fictional case study m-health; i-health; depression; nosography; categorizations; symptoms networks; ecological momentary assessment; ecological momentary intervention; fictional case study
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Briffault, X.; Morgiève, M.; Courtet, P. From e-Health to i-Health: Prospective Reflexions on the Use of Intelligent Systems in Mental Health Care. Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 98.

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