Next Article in Journal
Age-Dependency of Neurite Outgrowth in Postnatal Mouse Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Explants
Previous Article in Journal
Leveraging Neural Networks in Preclinical Alcohol Research
Open AccessArticle

Obesity is Associated with Reduced Plasticity of the Human Motor Cortex

1
Epi-Centre for Healthy Ageing, IMPACT Institute, School of Medicine, Deakin University, P.O. Box 281 (Barwon Health), Geelong VIC 3220, Australia
2
Innovation, Implementation and Clinical Translation (IIMPACT) in Health, Allied Health and Human Performance, University of South Australia, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(9), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090579
Received: 29 July 2020 / Revised: 13 August 2020 / Accepted: 17 August 2020 / Published: 21 August 2020
Obesity is characterised by excessive body fat and is associated with several detrimental health conditions, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. There is some evidence that people who are obese have structural and functional brain alterations and cognitive deficits. It may be that these neurophysiological and behavioural consequences are underpinned by altered plasticity. This study investigated the relationship between obesity and plasticity of the motor cortex in people who were considered obese (n = 14, nine males, aged 35.4 ± 14.3 years) or healthy weight (n = 16, seven males, aged 26.3 ± 8.5 years). A brain stimulation protocol known as continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the motor cortex to induce a brief suppression of cortical excitability. The suppression of cortical excitability was quantified using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to record and measure the amplitude of the motor evoked potential in a peripheral hand muscle. Therefore, the magnitude of suppression of the motor evoked potential by continuous theta burst stimulation was used as a measure of the capacity for plasticity of the motor cortex. Our results demonstrate that the healthy-weight group had a significant suppression of cortical excitability following continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), but there was no change in excitability for the obese group. Comparing the response to cTBS between groups demonstrated that there was an impaired plasticity response for the obese group when compared to the healthy-weight group. This might suggest that the capacity for plasticity is reduced in people who are obese. Given the importance of plasticity for human behaviour, our results add further emphasis to the potentially detrimental health effects of obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; neuroplasticity; body mass index; transcranial magnetic stimulation; theta burst stimulation obesity; neuroplasticity; body mass index; transcranial magnetic stimulation; theta burst stimulation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sui, S.X.; Ridding, M.C.; Hordacre, B. Obesity is Associated with Reduced Plasticity of the Human Motor Cortex. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 579.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop