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Dynamic Relationship between Sense of Agency and Post-Stroke Sensorimotor Deficits: A Longitudinal Case Study

by Yu Miyawaki 1,2,3,*, Takeshi Otani 4 and Shu Morioka 1,5
1
Graduate School of Health Science, Kio University, Kitakaturagi-gun, Nara 635-0832, Japan
2
Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083, Japan
3
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
4
Department of Rehabilitation, Ishikawa Hospital, Himeji, Hyogo 671-0221, Japan
5
Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Kio University, Kitakaturagi-gun, Nara 635-0832, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(5), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10050294
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 11 May 2020 / Accepted: 14 May 2020 / Published: 15 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Body in Brain Plasticity)
Post-stroke sensorimotor deficits impair voluntary movements. This impairment may alter a person’s sense of agency, which is the awareness of controlling one’s actions. A previous study showed that post-stroke patients incorrectly aligned themselves with others’ movements and proposed that their misattributions might be associated with their sensorimotor deficits. To investigate this hypothesis, the present study compared the agency dynamics in a post-stroke patient A (PA) with sensorimotor deficits, who rarely used her paretic upper limbs in her daily life to patient B (PB), who had a paretic upper limb with almost normal functions and activity. At the second, fourth, and eighth weeks following their strokes, PA and PB completed experiments where they performed horizontal movements while receiving visual feedback, and analyzed if the visual feedback represented their own or another’s movements. Consequently, PB made no misattributions each week; whereas, PA made incorrect self-attributions of other’s movements at the fourth week. Interestingly, this misattribution noticeably decreased at the eighth week, where PA, with an improved paretic upper limb, used her limb almost as much as before her stroke. These results suggest that the sense of agency alters according to the sensorimotor deficit severity and paretic upper limb activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: sense of agency; post-stroke; sensorimotor deficits; misattribution; cue integration; motor control; agency judgment; self-other attribution sense of agency; post-stroke; sensorimotor deficits; misattribution; cue integration; motor control; agency judgment; self-other attribution
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Miyawaki, Y.; Otani, T.; Morioka, S. Dynamic Relationship between Sense of Agency and Post-Stroke Sensorimotor Deficits: A Longitudinal Case Study. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 294.

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