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Open AccessArticle

The Reaction Switching Produces A Greater Bias to Prepotent Response than Reaction Inhibition

1
NTI Center for Neurotechnology and VR/AR Technologies, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690922, Russia
2
Far Eastern Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Education, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690922, Russia
3
Pacific Geographical Institute FEB RAS, Vladivostok 690014, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(3), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10030188
Received: 4 February 2020 / Revised: 16 March 2020 / Accepted: 23 March 2020 / Published: 24 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Systems Neuroscience)
There is a discussion about common or various mechanisms of response inhibition and response switching. To understand these mechanisms, we used a modified Go/NoGo task with three stimulus categories. The subjects were instructed to press a button in response to frequent Go stimuli, press another button in response to rare Go stimuli and hold any motor response following the presentation of NoGo stimuli. The results showed a decrease in reaction time for frequent Go, following both categories of rare stimuli and the decrease was greater following rare Go. Also, the total number of errors did not differ between Go and NoGo, however, a greater bias of error rate towards frequent Go stimuli was found for rare Go compared to NoGo. Finally, positive correlations were found between the increase in reaction time for rare Go compared to frequent Go and the number of errors for both rare Go and rare NoGo. Together, these results indicate that both rare Go and NoGo stimuli required to inhibit the prepotent response, but rare Go in comparison to NoGo stimuli also evoked a conflict between prepotent and alternative responses, which is expressed in greater response bias toward frequent Go. View Full-Text
Keywords: errors; reaction time; response inhibition; response switching errors; reaction time; response inhibition; response switching
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Fadeev, K.; Alikovskaia, T.; Tumyalis, A.; Smirnov, A.; Golokhvast, K. The Reaction Switching Produces A Greater Bias to Prepotent Response than Reaction Inhibition. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 188.

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