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Open AccessEditorial

Brain–Computer Interfaces: Toward a Daily Life Employment

by Pietro Aricò 1,2,3,*, Nicolina Sciaraffa 1,2 and Fabio Babiloni 1,2,3,4
1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
2
BrainSigns srl, Lungotevere Michelangelo 9, 00192, Rome, Italy
3
IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Neuroelectrical Imaging and BCI Lab, Via Ardeatina, 306, 00179 Rome, Italy
4
College of Computer Science and Technology, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(3), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10030157
Received: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 8 March 2020 / Published: 9 March 2020
Recent publications in the Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interface field suggest that this technology could be ready to go outside the research labs and enter the market as a new consumer product. This assumption is supported by the recent advantages obtained in terms of front-end graphical user interfaces, back-end classification algorithms, and technology improvement in terms of wearable devices and dry EEG sensors. This editorial paper aims at mentioning these aspects, starting from the review paper “Brain–Computer Interface Spellers: A Review” (Rezeika et al., 2018), published within the Brain Sciences journal, and citing other relevant review papers that discussed these points. View Full-Text
Keywords: passive brain–computer interface (pBCI); EEG headsets; daily life applications passive brain–computer interface (pBCI); EEG headsets; daily life applications
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Aricò, P.; Sciaraffa, N.; Babiloni, F. Brain–Computer Interfaces: Toward a Daily Life Employment. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 157.

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