Next Article in Journal
Prevalence of Cognitive Frailty, Do Psychosocial-Related Factors Matter?
Previous Article in Journal
Cognitive Benefits of Activity Engagement among 12,093 Adults Aged over 65 Years
Article

Age-Related Decline of Sensorimotor Integration Influences Resting-State Functional Brain Connectivity

1
Institute of Innovative Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503, Japan
2
Neural Information Analysis Laboratories, ATR, Kyoto 619-0288, Japan
3
Integrative Brain Imaging Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8551, Japan
4
PRESTO, JST, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan
5
Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, 20133 Milano, Italy
6
NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198, Japan
7
Center for Mind/Brain Science (CIMeC), University of Trento, 38123 Mattarello, TN, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(12), 966; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10120966
Received: 25 November 2020 / Accepted: 7 December 2020 / Published: 10 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of Brain Plasticity and Motor Circuits in Aging)
Age-related decline in sensorimotor integration involves both peripheral and central components related to proprioception and kinesthesia. To explore the role of cortical motor networks, we investigated the association between resting-state functional connectivity and a gap-detection angle measured during an arm-reaching task. Four region pairs, namely the left primary sensory area with the left primary motor area (S1left–M1left), the left supplementary motor area with M1left (SMAleft–M1left), the left pre-supplementary motor area with SMAleft (preSMAleft–SMAleft), and the right pre-supplementary motor area with the right premotor area (preSMAright–PMdright), showed significant age-by-gap detection ability interactions in connectivity in the form of opposite-sign correlations with gap detection ability between younger and older participants. Morphometry and tractography analyses did not reveal corresponding structural effects. These results suggest that the impact of aging on sensorimotor integration at the cortical level may be tracked by resting-state brain activity and is primarily functional, rather than structural. From the observation of opposite-sign correlations, we hypothesize that in aging, a “low-level” motor system may hyper-engage unsuccessfully, its dysfunction possibly being compensated by a “high-level” motor system, wherein stronger connectivity predicts higher gap-detection performance. This hypothesis should be tested in future neuroimaging and clinical studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: arm-reaching task; functional connectivity; kinesthesia; motor coordination; normal aging; proprioception; resting-state fMRI; sensorimotor integration arm-reaching task; functional connectivity; kinesthesia; motor coordination; normal aging; proprioception; resting-state fMRI; sensorimotor integration
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yoshimura, N.; Tsuda, H.; Aquino, D.; Takagi, A.; Ogata, Y.; Koike, Y.; Minati, L. Age-Related Decline of Sensorimotor Integration Influences Resting-State Functional Brain Connectivity. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 966. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10120966

AMA Style

Yoshimura N, Tsuda H, Aquino D, Takagi A, Ogata Y, Koike Y, Minati L. Age-Related Decline of Sensorimotor Integration Influences Resting-State Functional Brain Connectivity. Brain Sciences. 2020; 10(12):966. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10120966

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yoshimura, Natsue, Hayato Tsuda, Domenico Aquino, Atsushi Takagi, Yousuke Ogata, Yasuharu Koike, and Ludovico Minati. 2020. "Age-Related Decline of Sensorimotor Integration Influences Resting-State Functional Brain Connectivity" Brain Sciences 10, no. 12: 966. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10120966

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop