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Article

What Do We Learn from Good Practices of Biologically Inspired Design in Innovation?

1
The Biomimicry Institute, Innovation and Commercialization Manager, San Diego, CA 92101, USA
2
Biomimicry Switzerland, Founder and Managing Partner, 1207 Geneva, Switzerland
3
Technische Universität München (TUM), TUM Campus Straubing for Biotechnology and Sustainability, Biogenic Polymers, 94315 Straubing, Germany
4
Technische Hochschule Deggendorf (THD), Working group Biomimetics, 94078 Freyung, Germany
5
Active Innovation Management, 92300 Levallois-Perret, France
6
Department of Integrative Biology and Office of Educational Scholarship and Practice, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The two authors contributed equally to this work and are listed in alphabetical order.
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 650; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9040650
Received: 19 December 2018 / Revised: 8 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 14 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering)
Biologically inspired design (BID) is an emerging field of research with increasing achievements in engineering for design and problem solving. Its economic, societal, and ecological impact is considered to be significant. However, the number of existing products and success stories is still limited when compared to the knowledge that is available from biology and BID research. This article describes success factors for BID solutions, from the design process to the commercialization process, based on case studies and market analyses of biologically inspired products. Furthermore, the paper presents aspects of an effective knowledge transfer from science to industrial application, based on interviews with industrial partners. The accessibility of the methodological approach has led to promising advances in BID in practice. The findings can be used to increase the number of success stories by providing key steps toward the implementation and commercialization of BID products, and to point out necessary fields of cooperative research. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomimetics; biologically inspired design; biomimicry; industrial application; innovation; case studies; best practice; process and tools; sustainability biomimetics; biologically inspired design; biomimicry; industrial application; innovation; case studies; best practice; process and tools; sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chirazi, J.; Wanieck, K.; Fayemi, P.-E.; Zollfrank, C.; Jacobs, S. What Do We Learn from Good Practices of Biologically Inspired Design in Innovation? Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 650. https://doi.org/10.3390/app9040650

AMA Style

Chirazi J, Wanieck K, Fayemi P-E, Zollfrank C, Jacobs S. What Do We Learn from Good Practices of Biologically Inspired Design in Innovation? Applied Sciences. 2019; 9(4):650. https://doi.org/10.3390/app9040650

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chirazi, Jacques, Kristina Wanieck, Pierre-Emmanuel Fayemi, Cordt Zollfrank, and Shoshanah Jacobs. 2019. "What Do We Learn from Good Practices of Biologically Inspired Design in Innovation?" Applied Sciences 9, no. 4: 650. https://doi.org/10.3390/app9040650

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