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Article

Processing RGB Color Sensors for Measuring the Circadian Stimulus of Artificial and Daylight Light Sources

1
Laboratory of Adaptive Lighting Systems and Visual Processing, Technical University of Darmstadt, Hochschulstr. 4a, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany
2
Light and Health Research Center, Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Harry D. Kambezidis
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(3), 1132; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031132
Received: 26 November 2021 / Revised: 14 January 2022 / Accepted: 19 January 2022 / Published: 21 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Human-Centric Lighting)
The three main tasks of modern lighting design are to support the visual performance, satisfy color emotion (color quality), and promote positive non-visual outcomes. In view of large-scale applications, the use of simple and inexpensive RGB color sensors to monitor related visual and non-visual illumination parameters seems to be of great promise for the future development of human-centered lighting control systems. In this context, the present work proposes a new methodology to assess the circadian effectiveness of the prevalent lighting conditions for daylight and artificial light sources in terms of the physiologically relevant circadian stimulus (CS) metric using such color sensors. In the case of daylight, the raw sensor readouts were processed in such a way that the CIE daylight model can be applied as an intermediate step to estimate its spectral composition, from which CS can eventually be calculated straightforwardly. Maximal CS prediction errors of less than 0.0025 were observed when tested on real data. For artificial light sources, on the other hand, the CS approximation method of Truong et al. was applied to estimate its circadian effectiveness from the sensor readouts. In this case, a maximal CS prediction error of 0.028 must be reported, which is considerably larger compared to daylight, but still in an acceptable range for typical indoor lighting applications. The use of RGB color sensors is thus shown to be suitable for estimating the circadian effectiveness of both types of illumination with sufficient accuracy for practical applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: circadian effectiveness; circadian stimulus; RGB color sensors; daylight and artificial light sources; non-visual effects; human-centered lighting design circadian effectiveness; circadian stimulus; RGB color sensors; daylight and artificial light sources; non-visual effects; human-centered lighting design
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MDPI and ACS Style

Trinh, V.Q.; Babilon, S.; Myland, P.; Khanh, T.Q. Processing RGB Color Sensors for Measuring the Circadian Stimulus of Artificial and Daylight Light Sources. Appl. Sci. 2022, 12, 1132. https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031132

AMA Style

Trinh VQ, Babilon S, Myland P, Khanh TQ. Processing RGB Color Sensors for Measuring the Circadian Stimulus of Artificial and Daylight Light Sources. Applied Sciences. 2022; 12(3):1132. https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031132

Chicago/Turabian Style

Trinh, Vinh Q., Sebastian Babilon, Paul Myland, and Tran Q. Khanh. 2022. "Processing RGB Color Sensors for Measuring the Circadian Stimulus of Artificial and Daylight Light Sources" Applied Sciences 12, no. 3: 1132. https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031132

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