Next Article in Journal
Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticle Synthesis: An Overview of Methods of Preparation and Biomedical Applications
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluation of Cracks on the Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steel Using Experimental and Numerical Techniques
Previous Article in Special Issue
Interactive Effects of Scion and Rootstock Genotypes on the Root Microbiome of Grapevines (Vitis spp. L.)
Open AccessCommunication

Structural and Functional Shift in Soil Bacterial Community in Response to Long-Term Compost Amendment in Paddy Field

1
Department of Environmental and Biological Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644, Korea
2
Planning and Coordination Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, Wanju 55365, Korea
3
Crop Cultivation and Environment Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, Suwon 16429, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors have contributed equally to this work.
Present address: Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
§
Present address: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
Academic Editor: Stefano Castiglione
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 2183; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052183
Received: 18 December 2020 / Revised: 1 February 2021 / Accepted: 4 February 2021 / Published: 2 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Factors Shaping the Soil Microbiome)
Microbial community composition and diversity of agricultural soils primarily depend on management practices. The application of compost on agricultural fields is known to increase soil fertility, which can also help to enhance agricultural productivity. The effects of long-term application of compost along with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) (+Compost) on soil bacterial diversity and community profiles were assessed by amplicon sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and compared with those on soils that received only NPK but not compost (−Compost). Ordination plot showed treatments to cluster differently, implying changes in community composition, which were validated with taxonomical data showing Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and their related classes to be significantly higher in +Compost than in −Compost soils. The predicted abundance of functional genes related to plant growth promotion, development, and decomposition was significantly higher in compost-amended soil than in soils without compost. The results are of particular importance as they provide insights into designing management practices to promote agricultural sustainability. View Full-Text
Keywords: long-term fertilization; next-generation sequencing; bacterial diversity; plant growth long-term fertilization; next-generation sequencing; bacterial diversity; plant growth
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, S.; Samaddar, S.; Chatterjee, P.; Roy Choudhury, A.; Choi, J.; Choi, J.; Sa, T. Structural and Functional Shift in Soil Bacterial Community in Response to Long-Term Compost Amendment in Paddy Field. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 2183. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052183

AMA Style

Kim S, Samaddar S, Chatterjee P, Roy Choudhury A, Choi J, Choi J, Sa T. Structural and Functional Shift in Soil Bacterial Community in Response to Long-Term Compost Amendment in Paddy Field. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(5):2183. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052183

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Sookjin; Samaddar, Sandipan; Chatterjee, Poulami; Roy Choudhury, Aritra; Choi, Jeongyun; Choi, Jongseo; Sa, Tongmin. 2021. "Structural and Functional Shift in Soil Bacterial Community in Response to Long-Term Compost Amendment in Paddy Field" Appl. Sci. 11, no. 5: 2183. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052183

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop