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Article

Facilitating Successful Smart Campus Transitions: A Systems Thinking-SWOT Analysis Approach

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Centre for Sustainable Smart Cities, Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein 9301, South Africa
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Research, Innovation and Engagement, Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein 9301, South Africa
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School of Built Environment, Engineering and Computing, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds LS2 8AG, UK
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Department of Architecture and the Built Environment, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY, UK
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School of Architecture, Computing and Engineering, University of East London, London E16 2RD, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hyung-Sup Jung
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 2044; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052044
Received: 4 February 2021 / Revised: 22 February 2021 / Accepted: 23 February 2021 / Published: 25 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities in Applied Sciences)
An identification of strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) factors remains imperative for enabling a successful Smart Campus transition. The absence of a structured approach for analyzing the relationships between these SWOT factors and the influence thereof on Smart Campus transitions negate effective implementation. This study leverages a systems thinking approach to bridge this gap. Data were collected through a stakeholder workshop within a University of Technology case study and analyzed using qualitative content analysis (QCA). This resulted in the establishment of SWOT factors affecting Smart Campus transitions. Systems thinking was utilized to analyze the relationships between these SWOT factors resulting in a causal loop diagram (CLD) highlighting extant interrelationships. A panel of experts drawn from the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and South Africa validated the relationships between the SWOT factors as elucidated in the CLD. Subsequently, a Smart Campus transition framework predicated on the CLD archetypes was developed. The framework provided a holistic approach to understanding the interrelationships between various SWOT factors influencing Smart Campus transitions. This framework remains a valuable tool for facilitating optimal strategic planning and management approaches by policy makers, academics, and implementers within the global Higher Education Institution (HEI) landscape for managing successful Smart Campus transition at the South African University of Technology (SAUoT) and beyond. View Full-Text
Keywords: causal loop diagram; Smart Campus; systems thinking; universities causal loop diagram; Smart Campus; systems thinking; universities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Awuzie, B.; Ngowi, A.B.; Omotayo, T.; Obi, L.; Akotia, J. Facilitating Successful Smart Campus Transitions: A Systems Thinking-SWOT Analysis Approach. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 2044. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052044

AMA Style

Awuzie B, Ngowi AB, Omotayo T, Obi L, Akotia J. Facilitating Successful Smart Campus Transitions: A Systems Thinking-SWOT Analysis Approach. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(5):2044. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052044

Chicago/Turabian Style

Awuzie, Bankole, Alfred B. Ngowi, Temitope Omotayo, Lovelin Obi, and Julius Akotia. 2021. "Facilitating Successful Smart Campus Transitions: A Systems Thinking-SWOT Analysis Approach" Applied Sciences 11, no. 5: 2044. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052044

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